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Unboxing: TacPack September 2017

The September 2017 TacPack has arrived at JTT HQ. I am pretty happy with this one in terms of value and usefulness. Let’s see what’s inside.

Hopefully you are familiar with the concept of TacPack by now. If not, you can read the reviews of the previous TacPacks for some background on this subscription box.

HopticUSA Picatinny Bubble Level and Scope Dope Sticker – This is the star of the show for me. I just took the time to mount an optic as level as I possibly could on an SPR-ish AR-15 and was all set to purchase a bubble level. Then TacPack smiled upon me with this one from HopticUSA. It seems nice. It’s compact, machined from aluminum, and even has various lightening cuts machined into it to reduce the weight to a minimum. The scope dope sticker is a handy addition too.

Tactical Oatmeal Pistol Mag Carrier – This kydex double stack handgun magazine carrier is solid. It won’t win any awards for fit and finish as the edges are basically just deburred but not really cleaned up beyond that. It uses a basic plastic belt clip which is a functional choice for something like this since it allows OWB or IWB carry. I don’t care for this type of clip on holsters but it works well on a mag carrier. This is a useful addition.

MGM Switch View Eagle Eye – I’ve tried a few universal “cat tails” before but this one is easily the most svelte. I’ll admit that I am a little dubious as to whether it will hold up but if it does, it will be a killer product. It should fit a wide variety of optics.

Eagle Grit Hand Cleaner – This stuff is actually pretty neat. It takes all kinds of stuff off your hands – gun oil, hydraulic oil, grease, and whatever else you weirdos manage to get into. It’s just a hand cleaner but it works and I can definitely put it to use around the JTT Compound.

If you want to try TacPack, you can check them out at TacPack.com. TacPack hints that the October box will contain something springy, something sticky, and something sharp.. So, maybe it’s some Halloween candy with razor blades hidden in it or something better.

Disclosure: I receive TacPacks, free of charge, for review.

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Bargain or Just Cheap? – Real Steel H6-S1

Welcome to Bargain or Just Cheap? This series will review budget friendly knives for a variety of uses in a short format. All of the knives will cost less than $50 (in most cases, much less) and will be purchased out of my own pocket. I’ll buy them, carry them, and use them in an attempt to determine if the knife is a bargain or just cheap.


I have always been very leery of Chinese knife manufacturers due to their historically poor quality and penchant for knock-off designs. A friend cautioned me about throwing the baby out with the bath water and introduced me to a several Chinese knife manufacturers that are worth a look. One such manufacturer is Real Steel and their H6-S1 is the subject of today’s edition of Bargain or Just Cheap?.

Real Steel offers several variants of the H6 but there is one that I believe really stands out – the H6-S1. This knife floored me with how good it is for the price.

Specs:

Lock: Frame Lock

Pocket Clip: Right pocket, Tip up only

Steel: Sandvik 14C28N

Handle: Textured G-10 front, steel back

Blade length: 3.39 in.

Blade thickness: .12 in.

Open length: 7.76 in.

Weight: 3.8 oz.

Observations from Use

This knife is exceedingly likeable. It is at the upper end of our $50 price limit but it is dripping with great features, hallmarks of quality, and functional design.

The 14C28N is a step up from the blade steel found on many Chinese knives or any budget knife for that matter. This Sandvik steel is easy to sharpen, takes a polished edge VERY well, and holds it well enough for EDC tasks. I was very happy to see a Sandvik steel being used here. The drop point, slightly recurve blade has plenty of spine and features a full flat primary grind. It cuts and slices very well.

The handle is well contoured and comfortable with more than enough room for all your fingers. Both the G-10 and the steel lock side of the knife are thick and sturdy but overall the knife feels and carries very slim. Speaking of G-10, the thumb studs are actually machined G-10 that matches that handle color. They are large and easy to operate. The knife opens easily and smoothly with a flick of the thumb without even having to use your wrist.

The lock on my example is excellent. It looks up with about 60% engagement so it is very sturdy with room to wear in over time. The lock bar features a very unique and very cool feature. It has a disk that at first glance looks like any Hinderer style lock bar stabilizer (a small stop designed to prevent lock bar over travel). Closer inspection reveals the fact that it can be pushed forward into a second position that actually blocks the lock bar from moving completely! In this position, the knife can not close on your hand without some kind of catastrophic breakage. The disk locks in each position with strong detent action so it is extremely unlikely that you will accidentally activate or deactivate it.

This knife is impressively light for a knife of these dimensions. There is some milling on the inside of the steel handle scale to remove weight. A full height flat grind also reduces weight as does a liner-less G-10 handle scale. It is larger in every dimension than the previously reviewed Kershaw Emerson CQC-4K yet it weighs less!

The pocket clip isn’t a true deep carry clip but it does place the knife very low in the pocket which is nice for professional settings. It is very stout and holds the knife securely.

Bargain or Just Cheap?

The fit and finish of this knife is very good. It has better than average steel, better than average materials, clever features, and a very functional design. It also happens to look great! It gives the impression of quality. I’ve seen them as low as $40 but they usually average around $45 for most variants of the H6. Honestly, I would feel good about this knife at twice the price.

There is nothing cheap about this knife other than the price. The Real Steel H6-S1 is most certainly a Bargain.

I will be using Amazon as the price base line for this series. All knives were purchased by me from Amazon: Real Steel H6-S1

 

Note: There are a number of H6 variants and colors available. The features vary significantly from variant to variant. Be sure you are buying the H6-S1 if want the features shown in this review.


Our goal is to represent knives for a variety of uses from EDC, to outdoor, to tactical knives. Do you have a favorite affordable knife? Let us know about it in the comments!

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Bargain or Just Cheap? – Kershaw Emerson CQC-4K

Welcome to Bargain or Just Cheap? This series will review budget friendly knives in a short format. All of the knives will cost less than $50 (in most cases, much less) and will be purchased out of my own pocket. I’ll buy them, carry them, and use them in an attempt to determine if the knife is a bargain or just cheap.


I’ve been carrying and using a Kershaw Emerson CQC-4K mostly because I was able to purchase it for $15. The ultra-low price was my initial attraction to it. It is one of the lowest priced options in the already very budget friendly line of Emerson designed Kershaw produced knives.

Specs:

Lock: Frame Lock

Pocket Clip: Reversible, Tip up only

Steel: 8Cr14MoV

Handle: Textured G-10 front, 410 steel back

Blade length: 3.25 in.

Closed length: 4.2 in.

Open length: 7.4 in.

Weight: 4.1 oz.

Observations from Use

There is a lot to like here. The size is great for EDC – plenty of blade for most EDC tasks, a long enough handle to support four fingers without crowding, and its very pocketable. The Emerson designed Wave Opening Feature works and is a great feature to have. The spear point blade has some belly, plenty of straight edge, and a useful point. The handle is comfortable in the hand. I find that it is also a good looking knife.

8Cr14MoV steel is a budget steel. It performs similarly to AUS-8. It is a stainless steel that sharpens easily. It lacks the edge holding ability of super steels but I find it completely acceptable. It is a solid, budget friendly steel and Kershaw seems to do well with it.

The lock on my example is very good. It locks up somewhat early so there is room for it to wear in and it does pass a spine whack test. The lock bar doesn’t stick and the detent is fairly strong and positive.

Unfortunately, there are some things about this knife that I don’t like. It is heavy for its size due to it’s thick 410 steel lock bar side and a full steel liner under the G-10 handle scale. The thumb disk doesn’t line up well with the relief cut in the handle making it difficult to access. Finally, the primary grind on this knife is a short, hollow grind that leaves the edge fairly thick. It cuts reasonably well but not as well as it could with a higher primary grind.

Bargain or Just Cheap?

If you like Emerson Wave Openers like me, you won’t find a cheaper one, especially with real G-10 handle scales. Unfortunately, the strange spacial relationship between the relief cut in the handle and the thumb disk strikes me as an avoidable design flaw with a very noticeable impact on how easy you can open the knife.

This knife might be a bargain when it can be found around $15-$18 but other than that I’ll say… Just Cheap. If you are going to spend over $20, I would pass unless you are drawn to its smaller size in relation to other Kershaw Emerson models. I think there are better, but larger, options in the Kershaw Emerson line like the CQC-6K which I will review at a later date.

All of the knives for this series will be purchased by me on Amazon: Kershaw Emerson CQC-4K


Do you have a favorite affordable knife? Let us know about it in the comments!

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Review: TALON Grips

Shooter skill is the single most important element of recoil control. However, having a grip surface that allows the shooters hands to more effectively grip the firearm can go a long way toward supporting those skills – especially when it comes to handguns. That is why, if you were to look in my safe, you would find some sort of home brew stippling job or a stick-on grip solution on nearly every handgun I own.

I’ve tried several stick-on grips over the years. I’ve cut my own simple shapes and tried a number of pre-cut products. Honestly, my own cut shapes tend to work out better than most pre-cut products because many of them have the same flaws. They don’t apply texture all the way around the grip and they don’t apply texture to the right places on the grip. Then I tried TALON Grips.

TALON Grips does not suffer the same design flaws. Their grips are cut in very complex shapes that allow them to be wrapped completely around the host gun. This is important so that you can apply grip pressure anywhere you need to on the grip.

They also cut their grips to cover the right parts of the gun for recoil control. I have used stick-on grips for Glocks that basically just cover parts of the front strap and the lower sides of the grip. Those are the areas where Glock already applied some texture! If you use a modern handgun grip and are applying crush or camming pressure to control recoil, the upper part of the grip where your support hand contacts it is one of the most important gripping surfaces. TALON Grips tend to extend their stick-on grips up into this area.

TALON Grips also offers two different textures. Their first offering was sandpaper/skate board grip tape style texture that they call Granulate. More recently they began offering a pebbled rubber texture. If I was never going to carry a handgun inside the waist band, I would choose the Granulate texture every time. If IWB or AIWB carry is in your future you might consider the Rubber texture as I find it to be more comfortable against my skin while still providing excellent grip (the Rubber texture is shown in the images of the Glock 43 in this post).

I also appreciate that TALON Grips offers a wide selection including most common, and even slightly uncommon, handguns. They even have products for things you might not expect. If you want a stick-on grip for a Mossberg 590 Shockwave, they have it. They even make stick-on grips for many of the common Glock magazine extensions on the market.

I have also found them to be very durable and I suggest that you carefully read the short, simple instructions provided with their product. Good prep and the application of light heat after the initial installation are key in making sure these last… and they do last. I have been very pleased with the longevity of TALON Grips products.

These kinds of stick-on grips have been around for a long time and there are a lot of choices. I have found that TALON Grips makes them better than any others I have tried.

Check out TALON Grips.

Wild Hedgehog Tactical Ouch Pouch

I’ve been carrying an Ouch Pouch from Wild Hedgehog Tactical for about a year. It spends most of its time in the hydration pack that I use for hiking and biking. I’ve had to raid it several times and I’ve really come to like this simple, compact first aid kit.

The Ouch Pouch isn’t that different from something you can build yourself… except you are going to have to pay up for large quantities of the components only to strip them down for use in a compact first aid kit. I like the quality of the components used in the Ouch Pouch. There are brands like Medline, 3M, and Curad. I also like the versatility of the selected components. Items like Steri Strips can be used a number of ways and can close some pretty nasty wounds in a pinch.

Components:

  • 1 Pair Nitrile Gloves
  • 1″x3″ Bandages (5)
  • 2″x4″ Bandages (2)
  • Gauze Pad
  • Aspirin Pack
  • Antihistamine Pack
  • Ibuprofen Pack
  • 3M Medical Tape
  • 2x Bacitraicin Antibiotic Gel Packs
  • Pack of 3M Steri Strips
  • Purell Wipe
  • 2x Iodine Wipes
  • ​2x Alcohol Wipes

I’ve added a couple doses of anti-diarrhea tablets to mine because nothing will ruin a day on the trail or at the range quite some intestinal distress. Other than that, this is a capable, basic, and fairly complete kit at a decent price.

Ouch Pouch at Wild Hedgehog Tactical

Adding a Weapon Light to a 10/22 the Easy Way

There are plenty of ways you can add a weapon light to a Ruger 10/22 and plenty of reasons you might consider doing so. In my case, I wanted to be able to illuminate critters who might be getting into the garden or hen house.

I posted a picture on Instagram yesterday of one of my 10/22s with a Streamlight TLR-1 attached in such a way that it could easily be activated with the index finger of the support hand. Someone asked which mount I was using and at the time I couldn’t remember so I checked around online to find out. The mount in question is the Pro Mag Tactical Barrel Band.

There aren’t many Pro Mag products I can recommend but the Tactical Barrel Band has worked out for me very well for more than 5 years. It easily replaces the OEM barrel band found on many 10/22 variants and provides a side rail, bottom rail, and fixed sling loop. You can flip it so that the rail and sling loop are on either side and it is machined from aluminum.

I have come to like this mount quite a bit. It’s easy to install, provides a useful front sling mount, and places the light in such a way that it is easy to active both momentary and constant modes. I would prefer that the side rail was a bit longer but the adjustable clamp style mount found on the TLR-1 attaches securely.

ProMag Tactical Barrel Band

Review: Outdoor Research Sun Runner Cap

I’ve always liked Outdoor Research’s caps and I’ve owned a number of them over the years. The Sun Runner Cap in particular stands out as my favorite. It just works for me and the things I do outdoors better than any other cap I’ve tried.

Overview

The Sun Runner Cap is, as the name implies, designed to keep the sun off its wearer. The cap itself has 6 panel construction which is very comfortable to wear. The large panels on either side of the had are made from mesh while the top and front panels are made from the same thin Supplex nylon that OR uses in many of their caps.

The stiffened and preshaped brim is shorter and rounder than a typical ball cap. It also features two snaps that allow the Sun Runner to mount the included cap which is also made out of Supplex nylon.

Observations from Use

One of the biggest reasons I like this cap is the fit. OR offers the Sun Runner in 4 different sizes: S, M, L, and XL. I have a big head and finding caps that fit well can be a challenge. The Sun Runner offers plenty of adjustment. The fit is perfect and even comes down low on my head (below the tops of my ears) which is rare for me.

This hat also breathes and wicks perspiration extremely well. I own the hat in White and Hydro (Blue). The White one in particular feels cooler than my uncovered head! It reflects the sun’s heat and the side panels allow the hat to breath so that you actually get some evaporative cooling action from the hat band. Speaking of the hat band, it does a great job of keeping sweat out of your eyes.

The Sun Runner also does a great job of dealing with the sun – especially for shooters. The underside of the brim is a very dark grey that cuts down on glare which is nice when your eye is buried in an optic and your trying to pick out a distance target. OR purposely uses a dark color under the brim on all the Sun Runner colorways. The included cape drapes down and covers the back of your neck even when you drop into the prone which is a godsend if you are in a precision rifle class and spending a lot time in the prone. If you find that the cape is interfering with your cheek weld, just flip the removeable chin cord back behind your neck and tighten it slightly. This will keep the sides of the cape back and away from your face while still providing full neck coverage.

I should also note that this cap lacks a “button” on the crown like those found on ball caps. It also fits very close to the head which makes it very comfortable to wear with over the ear hearing protection. You can even attach the cap over your ear muffs with a little work but I usually just let my ear muffs hold the cape back or use inside the ear hearing protection.

I also use the cap extensively for hiking. It’s relatively lightweight at around 3 ounces (less if you don’t need the cape). It is very packable thanks to the compact brim and unstructured top. It even fits in most pants pockets though a cargo pocket works best. It’s a great three season cap in my area where we deal with lots of sun and heat in late spring through early fall.

Wrap Up

I like the Sun Runner Cap so much that I bought two of them. It deals with sun, heat, and sweat better than any other cap I’ve owned. It’s perfect for a carbine class, hiking, and working outside. If all that isn’t enough, you feel like Lawrence of Arabia when you wear it with the cape attached and that is worth something.

I bought one of my hats locally but I got a much better deal on the second one by purchasing it online at Amazon. OR occasionally discontinues certain colors which usually results in deep discounts so keep an eye out for that. OR Sun Runner Cap on Amazon

EZ Accuracy GBDT (Gas Block Dimple Tool)

Dimpling an AR-15 barrel serves a couple of important purposes. It indexes the gas block to ensure that the gas block aligns with the barrel’s gas port. It also serves as a detent that prevents the gas block from spinning if it is impacted. In spite of this, most AR-15 manufacturers that offer low profile gas blocks, still do not dimple their barrels. Now, it’s easier than ever to do it yourself.

I recently received a GBDT or Gas Block Dimple Tool from EZ Accuracy in a TacPack. Since that time, I’ve used it to dimple 5 gas blocks and I’ve purchased two more of them to give as gifts. I am thrilled with the GBDT and think it makes a great addition to any AR-15 owner’s work bench.

The GBDT is simple – I mean really, really simple – and that is what is best about it. It comes with two parts: a 10-32 hollow screw and a tiny center punch. You can pretty much figure out how to use it by looking at it but is also comes with simple instructions.

To dimple your barrel, you simple remove one the set screws from your gas block. There are usually at least two set screws in a low profile gas block. You should leave the others in place so that the gas block can not move. Replace the removed set screw with the included hollow screw and hand tighten. Place the included center punch in the hollow screw with the pointed end toward the barrel. Give it a tap with a hammer to center punch the barrel (prevents the drill bit from walking in the next steps). Remove the center punch and replace with a sharp 1/8″ drill bit. Drill only slightly into the barrel. You’re done. It takes less than 5 minutes.

The dimple doesn’t need to be deep to work so be conservative with your depth. Drill bits are cheap – use a fresh one. One dimple per gas block is typically enough. I prefer to dimple under the set screw closest to the receiver as this one is typically in the same location on many gas blocks.

The EZ Accuracy GBDT is $16 well spent.

Check it out: EZ Accuracy GBDT

Review: TacPack July 2017

The July 2017 TacPack has arrived at JTT HQ. I’m just going to say this up front. This is the best one yet. It is full from top to bottom and front to back with stuff I will use. Let’s look inside.

Hopefully you are familiar with the concept of TacPack by now. If not, you can read the reviews of the previous TacPacks for some background on this subscription box.

BreakThrough Clean Kit – I don’t really spend a lot of time cleaning guns but everyone has to grudgingly clean once in a while (I’ll never understand you weirdos who like cleaning guns). If you have a gun, you can use this. It comes with solvent, oil, 2 packets of grease, a doubled ended nylon AP brush, and a microfiber towel (which will change your life if you haven’t used one before). I’ve generally been happy with BreakThrough clean products and I especially like that they are pretty much odorless. This is a useful addition.

EZ Accuracy Gas Block Dimple Tool – Most AR-15 manufacturers offer low profile gas blocks as an option but the majority of them still don’t dimple the barrel as a reference for gas block alignment. This product solves that problem. You back out one screw in your gas block and replace it with the special hollow screw provided in this kit which allows you to center punch the spot to be dimpled with the included punch. The hollow screw then acts as a guide for a 1/8″ drill bit so you can quickly and easily dimple your barrel to ensure that the gas block goes back on in the exact same place should you ever need to remove it. You won’t use this every day but you’ll be glad you have it.

Fusion Climbing Runner/Sling and Locking Carabiner – The hits keep coming with this box! I don’t climb but everyone knows you can use a carabiner in about a million ways. I use them all the time in rigging for all the wood cutting I do. The included steel screw gate carabiner will be put to use right away. If you don’t climb, you may be less familiar with runners (or some people call them slings). They are basically really strong loops used for all kinds of things in climbing. I use them to girth hitch things like snatch blocks/pulleys to trees for redirecting pulls with the come-along winch I use when wood cutting. You can find all kinds of uses for items like these from tying into your tree stand to hanging a bear bag on your next overnighter.

5.11 Tactical Wharn Knife – The 5.11 Tactical value knives are actually solid little knives for the price. Knife nerds won’t get off on the AUS 8 blade steel but knife users know it as a fine grained steel that takes a refined edge easily. The ergonomics on this Mike Vellkamp design will take you by surprise. The blade moves VERY smoothly and it locks up well. This is probably the best knife to find its way into a TacPack yet.

MOAB Patch – And you thought MOAB stood for Mother of All Bombs… Nah. It’s Mother of All Bottlerockets!

I rate these boxes on the basis of whether or not I will actually use the included items. With that in mind, this is easily the best box to date. Everyone reading this right now needs gun cleaning items. Even if you don’t know it yet, carabiners and runners/slings are really handy. You can easily find room in a kit for a knife like this and I never would have known about the EZ Accuracy GBDT if it weren’t for TacPack. It is boxes like these that keep me talking about TacPack.

If you want to try TacPack, you can check them out at TacPack.com. TacPack hints that the August box will contain some Mission First Tactical gear.


Disclosure: I receive this subscription box from TacPack, free of charge, for review.

Sawyer Squeeze and Mini Water Filters

When it comes to outdoor equipment (or really anything) the best is rarely cheap. That is exactly what makes the Sawyer Squeeze and Mini Water Filters standout. They are the best trail filters that I have used and they are also the cheapest. That is a tough combination to beat.

Sawyer Squeeze PointOne

I’ve owned a Sawyer Squeeze since before 2013 when they updated the model to include some new fittings and redesigned bags (much needed, the original bags don’t hold up well). That little filter has produced a lot of clean drinking water in that time and it has earned a permanent place in my hiking pack. I have had the Sawyer Mini for much less time but it is equally easy to use, has more versatile connections, is smaller, weighs less, and costs even less (I’ll compare the two later in this article).

Sawyer Mini

Rather than go on and on about these filters, I’ll lay out what I like about both of them. Then, I’ll address them each individually.

What I like about both filters:

  • Compact and lightweight – The Squeeze weighs in at 3 ounces and the Mini at 2 ounces. Both are considerably smaller than any of my previous filters. They are small and light enough to live in my pack – even if I am just on a day hike and carrying all the water I will need.
  • Affordable – These cost between $20-30 for the basic packages. That is less than 1/4″ the cost of my previous ceramic trail filter. The entire filter with bag(s) cost less than just the replacement filters my old system.
  • Durable – These are made from plastic with no ceramic elements. They can take a beating.
  • Reliable Filtering – Both filters boast an absolute .1 micron rating. They get the nasties out.
  • Easy to Use – There is no pumping, no inlet hose to clean, no ceramic filters to clean, and no fuss. Squeeze dirty water through and drinkable water comes out. It’s easy.
  • Versatile – These work with the provided bags but they also thread right onto standard 20 ounce and 2 liter bottles. They can be set up as inline filters on your hydration bladder or as gravity filters on something like an MSR Dromedary Bag.

What I like about the Squeeze:

  • The Squeeze filter has more filter media than the Mini so it is slightly easier to drink from. If you plan to use the simplest set up, which would be to gather unfiltered water in bags/bottles and drink directly from them, the Squeeze works best but…

What I like about the Mini:

  • It is smaller and lighter than the Squeeze and can be used in all the same ways.
  • It has more versatile attachment points built in.
  • It costs less.

The next obvious question is which should you choose. I would (and did) probably just buy the Mini in most cases. It does everything the Squeeze does minus a little flow rate. It’s smaller, lighter, costs less, and a bit more versatile. However, the Squeeze is a bit easier to use in the most straightforward setup so it may be a better choice for cavemen.

Tips:

  • If you are using Sawyer’s water bags, roll them like a toothpaste tube instead of squeezing. They last longer that way.
  • Don’t let your filter freeze (true for all filters, not just these). It can wreck the filter media and there is really no practical way to test the Sawyer filters for damage. Bring it in your sleeping bag at night and tuck it inside your coat during the day to prevent freezing. If you think it froze, replace it.
  • 2 Liter bottles (or any bottles you can scavenge) are great for use with these filters. They are light weight and can be squeezed hard without breaking. Keep the cap so you can squeeze the air out and reseal to take up less space in your pack.
  • I know Sawyer has improved their bags but I have trust issues with them due to my original bags failures. Evernew makes great water bags that have compatible threads. I own several and greatly prefer them to the Sawyer bags. The threads on Platypus bags don’t quite match but some users say they can get them to work.
  • Filling water bags completely full unless you have some tricks up your sleeve. Blow them up with your mouth before submerging or place them under falling water to make filling easier. You can also make a lightweight scoop by cutting the top off of a bottle and capping it. The scoop makes it easy to get the last few ounces of water into the bag.
  • Even if you don’t hike and hate the outdoors, these are so compact and light that they are right at home in a car kit or “bug out bag”. I use a rubber band to wrap a water bag around the filter so it stays compact. You can add a short section of tubing so you can drink right from the source if necessary.
  • They are so small and light, you might even want to carry two – especially in cold weather.

If they were already convenient enough… You can stroll right into most Walmarts and buy them. They are available with a dizzying array of options and even multi-packs. I generally just buy the basic set up and I bought my Mini on Amazon for less than $20.

Sawyer PointOne Sqeeze Water Filter on Amazon

Sawyer Mini on Amazon

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