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Bargain or Just Cheap? – Steel Will Modus F25

Welcome to Bargain or Just Cheap? This series will review budget friendly knives for a variety of uses in a short format. All of the knives will cost less than $50 (in most cases, much less) and will be purchased out of my own pocket. I’ll buy them, carry them, and use them in an attempt to determine if the knife is a bargain or just cheap.


There was a time when Chinese made knives were mostly junk – at least those that were imported and sold very inexpensively. That is changing thanks to a wave of manufacturers like Steel Wil and othersl that are offering some really excellent knives that are often priced very competitively. That is certainly the case with the subject of today’s installment of Bargain or Just Cheap? – the Steel Will Modus F25.

Steel Will often offers two versions of the same design, one with more premium materials and one with more working class materials like FRN handle slabs and D2 steel. I often tend toward to working class model because they are very affordable and I actually happen to like D2 steel and FRN (plastic) as a handle material from all my years carrying Spyderco knives. The particular version of the Modus that I purchased is the F25-12 model. It features a 3.25″ D2 steel blade with green FRN handles.

The Modus features a modified sheepsfoot shape. Most sheepsfoot knives have a completely straight edge but the Modus’ edge sweeps gently up toward the tip giving it some belly. The blade is quite tall for a folder and the primary flat grind is nearly full height which does a very good job of thinning the edge. It cuts and slices very well.

The handle feels great in the handle and the texture provided by the patterned FRN scales is great. The full steel liners under the FRN have been skeletonized to reduce weight.

The lock up on these Steel Will liner locks is excellent. They typically exhibit early lock up with full engagement. The lock up on my Modus is among the best I have seen on a liner lock.

The Modus weighs in at under 3.4 ounces and it its FRN handle makes it very easy on pockets. The pocket clip is quite good with tip down left or right side carry, solid tension, and no sharp edges. I find these knives to be a joy to carry.

I think my favorite thing about these knives is how well they deploy. They are opened via a flipper and Steel Will has absolutely mastered the art of the flipper even without the use of ball bearing pivots which is mildly mind blowing. This knife is buttery smooth and has a perfect detent. It fires open easily and locks up with a satisfying snick.

NOTE: I have seen one Steel Will flipper that didn’t deploy well. It turns out the phosphor bronze washers were installed backwards (the smoother, more rounded side should be against the blade). Once they were corrected, the knife fired like a champ. It’s an easy fix.

Bargain or Just Cheap?

The Steel Will Modus is an EDC gem. It isn’t just a good knife, it is one of my favorite knives!

At around $40, it is definitely a bargain. It is light weight, deploys smoother than many flippers costing significantly more, and offers a lot of cutting performance in a sensibly sized package.

I am using Amazon as the price base line for this series. All knives were purchased by me from Amazon: Steel Will Modus F25-12 (there are other colors available)


Our goal is to represent knives for a variety of uses from EDC, to outdoor, to tactical knives. Do you have a favorite affordable knife? Let us know about it in the comments!

The above article contains affiliate links.

The EDC Tool Roll: Crescent 4″ Adjustable Wrench

The EDC Tool Roll is a feature on Jerking the Trigger in which we profile various every day carry worthy tools. The tools shown aren’t multi-tools but rather real tools, that by virtue of their compact size, light weight, usefulness, or unique functionality, can find a place in any range kit, emergency kit, or every day carry bag.

Feel free to comment on the tools that you carry so we can all learn! The discussion on these posts has been very valuable so far.


The way I see it, if you are going to carry something like a compact ratchet set or the incredible Knipex Pliers Wrench in your EDC Tool Roll, you also need to carry something like an adjustable wrench. You can use a set of pliers to hold a bolt in place while you tighten a nut but good hardened pliers will make a mess of the bolt with their sharp jaws. This is why my version of The EDC Tool Roll almost always includes a small adjustable wrench.

The Crescent AT24VS might be the best deal going in compact adjustable wrenches. Mine was sent to me by a friend, Dann S. in Ohio, who finds them regularly for $4-5 at local farm stores. They are often located in a bin near the registers like all good impulse buys should be. These wrenches cost more online.

The AT24VS is a drop forged wrench with machined flats. It has a smoothly turning knurl that makes adjusting the wrench easy, even with gloves. There is a laser etched scale on one side of the jaws but it is difficult to read in some light conditions. The black oxide finish on mine has held up well though, like most tools that aren’t chromed, I do put a bit of oil on it when I clean it up.

The combination of relatively comfortable handle, compact size, and easy adjustment have me reaching for this wrench fairly frequently. It might be the best bargain of the wrenches we have covered so far if you can find it the cheap farm store price.

Where to Buy:

Your best bet is to try to find this locally. Crescent brand wrenches are not hard to find and if you can find it at $4-5, it is a no-brainer. Online prices aren’t nearly as attractive but it is available on Amazon: Crescent AT24VS on Amazon

Previously Reviewed Alternatives:

  1. Channellock 804 4.5″ Adjustable Wrench
  2. Knipex Pliers Wrench (86 03 125)
  3. Lobster UM24SS Shorty Adjustable Wrench

See all the reviews for previous tools: The EDC Tool Roll

Do you have a compact adjustable wrench that you prefer or another tool recommendation that fits The EDC Tool Roll? Tell us about it in the comments below or drop us a line on the Contact page.

The above URLs may be affiliate links.


Review: Streamlight Microstream USB

I’ll spoil this review right up front. I really, really like my Streamlight Microstream USB.

Overview

The Microstream USB is an extremely compact LED light. It features a tail switch, a two way pocket clip (that is removable and replaceable), and two output settings (250 lumens for 1.5 hours and 50 lumens for 3.5 hours). This light is USB rechargable via a USB-C cord (included). It is less than 4″ long, barely wider than a AAA battery, and weighs a little more than 1 ounce.

The Microstream USB is available in a number of anodized colors but I recommend the FDE version because it is the only one that gives you the high output mode on the first click. The other colors (Black, Blue, Red) activate the 50 lumen mode on the first click.

Observations from Use

I normally prefer single output lights for EDC but the Microstream USB gets a pass. Streamlight designed it so that you could only access the 50 lumen low mode with a very fast double click. You can execute typical low light techniques without ever dropping into the 50 lumen mode. The user interface is dead simple and well designed.

The power to weight ratio on this light is incredible. It is so small and so lightweight that you will never leave it at home. It still has large light features like 250 lumen output and a tail switch in spite of that small size.

I typically carry a USB backup battery both at the office and on the trail. That makes it easy to keep this light up and running no matter where I am.

The light is recharged by sliding the bezel up to reveal the USB-C port and a small charge indicating LED (red for charging, green for charged). This sliding collar is o-ring sealed and it seams to do a good job given that my light has been through the wash with no ill effects. Still, this is the source of my major criticism of the light. I wish that this was sliding collar was threaded so that it had to be screwed down over the o-ring. This would make it even less likely to have water ingress. As it stands now, the user will have to keep a sharp eye on the o-ring to ensure that it is in good shape.

Wrap Up

This light is a tiny power house. I have larger lights with more output that I can can carry but this light is so small, lightweight, useful, and cheap to operate that I often carry it as a backup or even my primary light. It’s affordable too (less than $30)!

Have I said that I really, really like this light?

I had trouble finding the FDE anodized version when I bought mine last year. Now they are much easier to find. I purchased mine at Amazon who happened to be one the only places that had them in stock at the time: Streamlight Microstream USB on Amazon

Evernew Cross Stand 2 for the Trangia Spirit Burner

I’ve been using my Trangia Spirit Burner (alcohol stove) for a while now based on the recommendation of the folks at Hill People Gear. In the time I have used it, I have tried several pot stands and haven’t really been over the moon about any of them. The biggest problem is that they are often too large for use with a small pot. They also often too bulky or inefficient due to placing the pot too close to the jets.

A friend recommended the Evernew Cross Stand which is an “X” shaped stand made from titanium that is designed to sit on top of the Trangia (or Evernew Alcohol Burner). However, I found that it sat too low on the Trangia. Fortunately, Evernew makes a second version, the Cross Stand 2, that sits higher and places the bottom of the pot about 1″ above the jets.

My experience with the Cross Stand 2 has been excellent. It weighs less than an ounce as you might expect for something made of thin titanium with plenty of skeletonization cuts. It packs completely flat and should fit inside just about any mess kit. It’s height allows for a very efficient burn and it is really optimized for solo cook pots or nesting cups. I pair it with a simple aluminum foil wind screen to further optimize efficiency.

The Cross Stand 2 is marvel of simplicity and it has been a great solution for me. If you carry a Trangia in your hiking gear or preparedness gear, this could be a good solution for you toon. They are available on Amazon: Evernew Cross Stand 2 on Amazon

You are like to find even lower prices if you shop around.

Two Thumbs Up: Outdoor Research Customer Service

I have purchased lot of gear from Outdoor Research over the years including multiple pairs of gloves, hats, insulation payers, shell layers, and more. My experiences with the products themselves have been great but until recently, I never had occasion to test their “Infinite Guarantee”.

I purchased a Ferrosi Hooded Jacket (which is an incredible layer worthy of its own review soon) recently from an online retailer. It was on sale for a very good price. When I received the jacket, I noticed that chest pocket was sewn or welded shut via some assembly step gone awry. The retailer was already out of the jackets so they would be unable to replace it.

I called the number listed on the Outdoor Research website to see if this was something that they would exchange for me. I was bracing myself for having to deal with an automated call center or for them to tell me to take it up with the retailer. To my great surprise, my call was answered by a live person after just a couple of rings and I was informed that the replacement would be covered. All I needed to do was fill out their online replacement form which was easy.

OR issued a pre-paid return label via email within 48 hours of me completing thereplacement form and they sent an additional email explaining the actions they would take. They shipped the replacement right away, before they even received my return so I had it in just 2 business days.

It isn’t just impressive that they so completely dealt with my issue at no additional cost to me but how painless, polite, and personal they made the entire process. That is definitely not the norm these days. Kudos to OR!

OutdoorResearch.com

The EDC Tool Roll: Bond Travel Gear Tool Roll

The EDC Tool Roll is a feature on Jerking the Trigger in which we profile various every day carry worthy tools. The tools shown aren’t multi-tools but rather real tools, that by virtue of their compact size, light weight, usefulness, or unique functionality, can find a place in any range kit, emergency kit, or every day carry bag.

Feel free to comment on the tools that you carry so we can all learn! The discussion on these posts has been very valuable so far.


If you are going to eschew multi-tools in favor of real tools, a well organized way of carrying your tools is going to make your life a lot easier. The Bond Travel Gear Tool Roll may be designed with items like cables, EDC gear, and travel items in mind but I am happy to report that it works very well with actual tools.

The Bond Travel Gear Tool Roll is a little bit large for pocket carry but it is doable in large pockets. I have been using it for a couple of months and found that taking some care with how to pack the tools makes a big difference. If you just stack the tools inside so that they butt up against each other when rolled, you won’t be able to roll it as tight. However, if you stagger them a bit, you can achieve a tighter roll, making the whole kit more compact.

The loops are excellent. There are 9 of them in various sizes so there should be one that works for just about any tool. They are made from heavy duty elastic that has held up well to my use. The loops are also coated with a grippy silicone strip on the inside that really grips the tools.

There are 3 wide slip pockets behind the loops. These are perfect for wider items than the loops will accept. I tuck my Chapman MFG Midget kit into one of them.

This tool roll has flaps at the top and bottom that keeps the tools from falling out when rolled. The flap does a great job of protecting other items in your pocket or bag from the hard or sharp edges found on many tools.

The Bond Travel Gear Tool Roll also has a zippered pocket which is absolutely clutch. It is a great place to store driver bits or other small items that would be difficult to retain with the loops.

The closure system consists of a hook on a strap. This is simple, robust, and very adjustable. It is perfect for this application.

I have come to really like this tool roll and not just for tools. It’s great for EDC gear too. If there was a smaller version available, I would probably call it perfect.

Where to Buy:

I have never seen Bond Travel Gear in a brick and mortar store. They were recommended to me by a friend who found them on Amazon so that is where I purchased mine: Bond Travel Gear Tool Roll on Amazon

Previously Reviewed Alternatives:

Maxpedition Micro Pocket Organizer


See all the reviews for previous tools: The EDC Tool Roll

Do you have a tool recommendation that fits The EDC Tool Roll? Tell us about it in the comments below or drop us a line on the Contact page.

The above URLs may be affiliate links.

Review: Streamlight TLR-7

Streamlight’s TLR-7 is their first entry into the compact, EDC weapon light market that has come about recently. Most of the lights in this space are giving up something in terms of output, runtime, and ergonomics to their full size counterparts. The best lights try to balance all of these factors. How well does the TLR-7 balance all of these considerations? Let’s dig in.

Specs:

  • Weight: 2.41 ounces
  • Length: 2.1″
  • Width: 1.2″
  • Output: 500 lumens
  • Runtime: 1.5 hours
  • Battery: 1x CR123A

Observations from Use

I will say up front that I really like this light with one caveat. Unfortunately, that caveat may be a big one for some shooters.The TLR-7 is the right kind of compact. It is built around a single CR123A battery and closely matches the width of many popular modern handguns. It isn’t just easy to carry. It’s very comfortable to carry. By matching the width of most handguns, Streamlight has made a light that can actually make your handgun MORE comfortable to carry. The holsters for this light, with something like a Glock, are often very flat and slab-like which seems to reduce hot spots… for me at least.

The output (500 lumens) and runtime (1.5 hours) are great and Streamlight nailed the beam shape. Some compact weapon lights have beams that are obviously very slanted toward illuminating objects at close range. This isn’t necessarily a bad thing but Streamlight has developed a very balanced beam pattern for the TLR-7 that offers a broad and bright hotspot with a generous spill beam. It is a great compromise between an “across the room” beam and an “across the parking garage” beam.

The TLR-7’s mounting system is solid, low profile, and adaptable. It comes with a variety of cross bars to accommodate just about any handgun. The locking disk can be turned with a flat blade screwdriver or an improvised item like a coin.

I especially like the lockout bezel feature on the TLR-7. Most light makers just tell you to back the bezel off the light in order to prevent accidental activation during storage or transport. Streamlight actually installed a tactile detent on the TLR-7 so you can feel when you hit the lock out point and the bezel is then less likely to back itself off any further during transport.

And now for the caveat… Streamlight designed this light to be compact and as you might expect, it’s activation paddles are also compact. Unfortunately, some users will find them too compact and difficult to reach. I lock the support hand wrist which places my thumb forward and high. Reaching the paddles and pushing them forward is not difficult for me with my medium sized hands… but it definitely isn’t as easy as a full sized weapon light. If your hands are smaller or your grip places your thumb further back on the grip, you may have difficulty operating this light.

I strongly recommend getting your hands on one these lights before you buy to ensure that it will work for you. If it does, I think you will be really pleased with it. I have just over 1200 rounds through my G19 with this light mounted with about 450 of those while actively testing the light. The light is working like second-nature to me with minimal adjustment to my grip but it is easy to for me to see how this might not ever work for some people.

Wrap Up

The TLR-7 offers a LOT of performance for a compact weapon light. The output and beam shape are excellent. The lock out feature is well executed and clever. If your grip and hand size will accommodate this light, I think it is a fine choice.

Streamlight.com

Review: Tuff Possum Gear Modified 10×12 Center-Zip Pouch

I have really come to like my Hill People Gear Tarahumara. It is an excellent small pack for summer hikes, quick trips into the woods, and more. However, sometimes I wish it had a bit more capacity. It has an excellent harness system that can support far more weight than you could ever stuff into it. In an effort to extend the Tara’s usefulness and capacity, I purchased a Modified 10×12 Center-Zip Pouch from Tuff Possum Gear.

Overview

The Modified 10×12 Center-Zip Pouch is aptly named. This pouch is 10×12″ in dimension and has a single central zip that gives accessing to a single pocket (much like the Tarahumara itself). It has two 1″ webbing anchor points on the top corners that allow it to be docked on the Tarahumara with the included ITW GrimLocs and is constructed from 500D Cordura Nylon.

I don’t have exact volume figures but given the dimensions, I would say that it adds around 200-250 cubic inches of capacity to the Tara (maybe more if you really stuff it). Those numbers are based on my measurements of the exterior dimensions when the pouch is packed normally.

Observations from Use

As straight-forward as this pouch seems, there is real thoughtfulness in the design. For instance, the dimensions are such that it perfectly matches the width of host Tarahumara and the length allows it to be compressed with both of the Tarahumara’s compression straps. Additionally, the Tarahumara has a wedge shape that is thicker at the bottom. The Modified Center-Zip sits near the thinner top portion of the Tarahumara so it does not stick out that far from the wearer’s back. The whole package remains relatively sleek.

The included GrimLocs do a fine job of connecting the Modified Center-Zip to the Tarahumara. They are durable, secure, and very easy to operate even with gloves. However, I have also found that you can use Slik-Clips as a lighter weight, more compact attachment solution. They are harder to connect and disconnect but you likely won’t be taking the Modified Center-Zip on and off very often.

The Modified Center-Zip works a bit like a compression panel in that you can secure items behind it. Beware that the items that you are carrying will not fall out from the bottom. I especially like to carry an axe compressed in this manner when I am working on winter trail maintenance. You can also secure soft gear like a rain shell behind the pouch as long as you apply enough tension on the compression straps.

Obviously, the main use for this pouch is to extend the capacity of the Tarahumara but I have found a few other benefits. The Tarahumara lacks much in the way of organization but the Modified Center-Zip gives me a way to keep gear separated. For instance, I can keep my pitch covered folding saw in it instead of letting it wallow around in the main compartment where it can transfer sticky pitch to my other gear.

Wrap Up

If you have been looking for a way to extend the capacity of your Hill People Gear Tarahumara, I can highly recommend the Tuff Possum Gear Modified 10×12 Center-Zip Pouch. It is well made, easy to use, and works well with the pack’s existing shape and compression features.

Visit Tuff Possum Gear on Etsy


NOTE: Tuff Possum Gear is a small business that makes these pouches in batches. They are usually available in a variety of colors but there are brief times when they may not be in stock. They also offer a number of pouches that are similar in appearance but that are not designed to dock on the Tarahumara so double check your order.

The EDC Tool Roll: Streamlight Bandit Headlamp

The EDC Tool Roll is a feature on Jerking the Trigger in which we profile various every day carry worthy tools. The tools shown aren’t multi-tools but rather real tools, that by virtue of their compact size, light weight, usefulness, or unique functionality, can find a place in any range kit, emergency kit, or every day carry bag.

Feel free to comment on the tools that you carry so we can all learn! The discussion on these posts has been very valuable so far.


I don’t know about where you live, but my official sunset time is already before 4PM and it is going to be that way for a long time. I also live in a very rural location so when the sun sets, it gets DARK. That means I put a lot of miles on flashlights, work lights, and especially head lamps. I’ve come to realize that the beam profile I need while working is different the beam profile I need when I am on the trail. When it come to work, I need a beam that is broad and bright – basically a wall of light that covers everything with light at arms length from one edge of my vision to the other. That is exactly what the Streamlight Bandit provides… and it does it with style and a great price.

The Bandit might be the ultimate pocketable work light. It is compact enough to fit in The EDC Tool Roll and light weight enough in weight to wear for hours (1.3 ounces!). It has a polycarbonate body with a removeable bracket that serves as both an attachment point for the head strap and a clip for attaching the Bandit to the brim of a cap, lip of a pocket, some helmets or even just free standing on the ground or other surface.

It is USB rechargable which is incredible for someone who uses their headlamp as much as I do. This light contains sealed 450-mAh lithium polymer battery that provides 2 hours of runtime at 180 lumens or 9+ hours at 35 lumens. There is also a blinking mode which I never use.

The user interface is simple enough. There is one button. Push it once for low and again within a couple of seconds for high, then blink. After a few seconds, the next click turns off the light. The button is pronounced enough that it can be operated with gloves on.

There are a few factors that make this the best tool light I have right now and the reason it is being included in The EDC Tool Roll series. I have already mentioned that it is very light weight and very compact. That makes it easy to carry. The simple interface makes it easy to use and the USB rechargable feature makes it easy to keep up and running. It also happens to be EXTREMELY affordable – like buy two of them, impulse buy affordable –  at less than $16 each including shipping.

But, when it comes to use as a work light, the real story here is the beam… the glorious blast radius of lumens. The Bandit uses a COB LED which is basically a broad, flat, light emitting plate. There is no lens or reflector. You have no hotspot, just smooth even light for almost 180 degrees. This means I can see every little button, knob, and gauge in the open, unlit cabin of our tractors when I am blowing snow after dark (which really tests the water and cold resistance of a light). It means I can light up an entire room or everything at my feet while walking instead of just a narrow circle. It means I work up close on equipment with the light on high without having a blinding hotspot and without having to constantly adjust the angle of the light. Of course, that broad beam comes at the cost of throw, but you can’t have it all.

So far the Bandit seems to be quite tough and, based on past experience, I am confident that Streamlight will take care of me if something goes wrong. Given their customer service and the low cost of this light, I’m not afraid to use it like a tool. In fact, the low cost has me thinking of buying a second one so I always have one to use while the other is charging.

Where to Buy:

I bought mine on Amazon because they usually have a great price on the bright yellow version of the Bandit. I think I paid a little bit more than the sub $16 price they are charging as of the time of this writing: Streamlight Bandit on Amazon

Previously Reviewed Alternatives:

Nebo Tools Work Lights


See all the reviews for previous tools: The EDC Tool Roll

Do you have a pocketable work light that you prefer or another tool recommendation that fits The EDC Tool Roll? Tell us about it in the comments below or drop us a line on the Contact page.

The above URLs may be affiliate links.

Review: Salomon Quest 4D GTX Hiking Boot

I’ve been wearing Salomon Quest 4D GTX Hiking Boots for more than 4 years now. My first pair is still going strong after those four years and last summer I came across a deal on a new pair that I couldn’t refuse so I purchased a second pair. I wear them exclusively when I am hiking, shooting, and daily in the winter. I have no way of knowing how many miles I have on the first pair, but it is a few hundred in hiking miles alone not to mention the daily winter wear. I know these boots inside and out and it’s long past time I wrote a review.

I won’t waste a lot of words giving you an overview of these boots. They are Goretex lined hiking boots. The same can be said for a lot of boots. Instead, I will focus in on what sets these boots apart for me and why I like them.

Longevity

There are really two forms of longevity when it comes to footwear. The first is obvious and has to do with how long a pair of boots can last. I have found these boots to be extremely durable as evidenced by my experiences above. These boots have hiked over Selkirk granite and dusty summer trails. They have spent time in snow, rain, and been submerged during creek crossings. They have been worn as work boots while felling trees for firewood. They’ve been through a lot and the soles are still attached (although I did have to use a bit of Shoe Goo last summer), the toe cap is still attached, they are still water-proof, and the support hasn’t broken down.

The other form of longevity is just as important. There is nothing worse than wearing out a pair of boots that you love only to find that you can’t buy them anymore. Fortunately, the Quest 4D GTX boots have been in continuous production for years. They are actually in their 3rd generation now and while there are small changes, the fit and important features have remained the same (at least through the first two generations that I have used).

Fit and Support

You can boil down the reasons I tried these boots in the first place to two things: fit and support.

The fit is perfect for me and everyone that I have turned onto these boots has found the same thing. I find them to be somewhat narrow through the heel and arch, not overly so, but narrow enough. The toe box is very generous. When laced, I find that the shape of the collar provides plenty of room for your ankle to articulate in the direct that it should articulate. My feet aren’t narrow or wide but I do have high arches. These boots accommodate me very well.

When it comes to support, I have never had a better boot. Wearing the Quest 4D Boots is like wearing ankle braces on the trail. This is accomplished a few ways. First, the ankle area is very sturdy and shaped so the foot can hinge forward and back but has plenty of support for side to side flex. Second, the way these lace is excellent. The first few lace loops are fixed. The first lace hook actually grips the lace aggressively so you can really lock in your heel and set the tension on the lower part of the boot. This is the first boot I have owned with this kind of locking hook and it might be the most important feature to me.

These boots have taught me the importance of locking in the heel for my long term comfort. They actually have a rigid plastic heel cup that works with the previously mentioned locking hooks to really immobilize and support your foot. This has been key to how well these boots support my ankles and prevent blisters. That same rigid plastic component runs all the into the arch for extra arch support. I have never sprained an ankle in these boots (if you know me, you know that is saying something). I have also never had an out of control hotspot or blister in these boots. Those are the functional benefits of good fit and solid support.

Water-Proof Performance

I swore off Gore-Tex boots before I tried these. Some water-proof boots that I have owned have left me with extra foot care problems like blisters from moisture build-up. That hasn’t been the case with these though I do still wish there was an identical, non-waterproof version.

Salomon does make a Quest 4D Boot without Gore-Tex in their military focused Forces line but it appears to have a different lace setup which has made me wary of trying them. If you have them, I would love to hear from you.

If you are stuck with water-proofing, at least it is well executed in these boots. My 4 year old Quest 4D Boots are still water-proof so the water-proofing has proven to be very durable. I also like that Salomon runs the waterproof membrane most of the way up the sides of the tongue, sort of like webbed duck feet. You have to submerge the boot all the way to the second lace hook before you have a chance of water ingress at the tongue which is handy during creek crossings.

Grip

I wear these boots hiking in conditions that vary from damp forest floors, to dusty summer trails, to miles of exposed granite, loose rock, and snow. These boots have an aggressive, long wearing sole that seems to grip wall across all those surfaces and in all directions. The soles on my 4 year old boots have been fairly long wearing and are still offering solid grip on the trail. The new boots seem to be somewhat more aggressive but it is hard to tell if that is because they are new or some change Salomon made to the sole.

Wrap Up

These are my go to boots for pretty much everything. They offer the support, grip, and sneaker like performance that I like for the shooting range or training courses. They have the fit, support, and durability I need for logging miles on the trail. They lock the heel and support my ankles better than any hiking boot I have ever owned. I like them so much that I keep a spare pair, broken in and ready to go.


A note on price… Premium boots are not cheap. These will typically cost around $230-$240 a pair. That hurt at first but using the same boots for 4 years stakes some of the sting out of paying up for them. BUT… You can shop around and save a ton. Salomon seams to roll out new colorways or even new generations of these boots with some frequency. If you can settle for last season’s color, you can save a lot of money. Black Friday and Cyber Monday are right around the corner too.

I have purchased my first pair for $240 at REI so I could try them on. I purchased my second pair for about $150 off retail because it was a discontinued colorway on Amazon. It is hard to pass on a $240 pair of boots for around $100 shipped.

Click Here: Salomon Quest 4D Boots on Amazon

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