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Review: Danger Close Consulting Low Pro Scout Mount

Here is the bottom line up front…The Danger Close Consulting (DCC) Low Pro Scout Mount is the mount that should come with the Surefire M600 Scout Light from the start! I have had this for a couple of weeks now and it is everything that I hoped it would be and does everything I hoped it would do.

The DCC Low Profile Scout Mount works great on the Daniel Defense 9.5FSP Lite Rail.

Problem Solver

I think the one of the best compliments you can pay to a piece of gear is to say that it solves a problem. This mount solves multiple problems. The M600 Scout Light is a great weapon light in its stock form but it has some shortcomings, especially for those who will be using it without the remote pressure pad switch (I despise them). The stock mount places the light too low in relation to the shooter’s support hand grip. The light falls in a place that is awkward to reach with the support hand thumb. The stock mount also places the light high above the rail and has a large thumb screw that can be a snag magnet.

The DCC Low Pro Mount allows the user to place the light at around 11 o’clock on the rail and it tucks the light in very close to the rail. This is a much more natural position to hit with the thumb of the support hand and there is no more thumb screw to snag anything and everything.

Here you can see just how low profile the mount really is.

Attention to Detail

Attention to detail is often what separates good gear from great gear and the DCC Low Pro Scout Mount is great gear. The mount is very nicely machined with no visible machining marks. The hard anodized finish is smooth and evenly applied. There is a large hole that has been machined away to save weight. It would have been easier and cheaper to just machine a round hole, but DCC chose to mill a more complex shape that would save more weight. The set screw that provides tension against the rail even has a small rubber pad to prevent the steel screw from gouging your aluminum rails. That is attention to detail.

Note the lightening cut.

Locked Down

This mount is solid. The light is held to the mount with 2 screws (provided). I used a bit of Loc-Tite on both screws. The mount itself must be slid onto the rail from the end. The set screw should then be positioned in a rail slot. Once the set screw is in position, you simply tighten the set screw. This keeps the mount from moving forward and back by dropping into a slot and by pulling the mount up against the under side of the rail. It is rock solid.

Here you can see the two mounting screws and the green rubber pad on the set screw.

In Use

The difference when you are actually using the light must be felt to be believed. Those who are familiar with trying to use an M600 Scout Light with the factory mount will know immediately what an improvement this mount has the potential to be. I shoot with a vertical grip but I don’t wrap my hand around it. I use a thumb forward grip on it much like I would with my support hand when shooting a handgun. The original Surefire mount didn’t work very well with this grip. It was simply too low since it could only be mounted at 9 o’clock on the rail. I would have to contort my hand and shift my grip to get my thumb down to the tail cap which basically meant that I left the light unused. Now, with the DCC, the tail cap falls much more naturally under my support hand thumb at around 11 o’clock on the rail. I no longer have to shift or contort my grip and the light is much more usable.

Verdict: Buy One!

Jon at DCC is a genuinely nice guy and he is active in the Army Special Forces so he knows a bit about what makes gear work. If that isn’t enough reason to buy one, then knowing that this is the only mount of its kind should be. If you running the M600 Scout Weapon Light with the “clickie” tail cap then you need this mount. Buy one.

Look for an upcoming interview with Jon at Danger Close Consulting on Jerking the Trigger.

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Magpul RVG Vertical Grip

The Magpul RVG Vertical Grips are shipping. You may remember these from SHOT Show 2010.

These have some pretty nice features for such an affordable grip. The RVG comes with a short section of rail so the RVG can be mounted to your MOE handguard. It is designed to be used comfortably with a thumb forward grip.

I like that the design is hollow so the grip to can be trimmed to whatever length the shooter desires. Some shooters, who use the RVG as a handstop or index point, will only need a small stub of a grip. A few moments with a hack saw and some sand paper will allow the user to completely customize the length of the RVG.

I have only seen these available in black, but I suspect that other colors will be available soon.

Tactical Tailor Elite Series Packs

They are finally here! I have been waiting to see detailed info on these packs for months. Until now Tactical Tailor’s pack offerings have been pretty vanilla but these really have some nice features.

Modular Operator Pack

This is a pretty slick 3-Day size pack with some nice features. One feature that I really like in a pack is the use of a high contrast interior liner. This can make finding small items easy in difficult lighting situations.

Urban Operator Pack

This is a lower profile urban style pack. It would be great for a commuter or EDC style pack.

Removeable Operator Pack

This one really has my attention. I am a big fan of the Kifaru E&E and this bag uses a similar concept. It can be a stand-alone pack for when you need to travel light or it can be easily docked on a larger pack to serve as extra storage or an E&E pack. You could easily store some basics (a knife, way to purify water, a poncho for shelter, spare ammo, some rations, and a way to make fire) in this pack just in case you had to drop your larger pack for some reason. This is a great concept and it is a bit bigger than the Kifaru E&E.

Extended Range Operator Pack

The largest offering is the Extended Range Operator Pack. This has some pretty series capacity and an internal frame to help you carry it. It also has some really nice internal organization which many large packs lack. It is absolutely covered in PALS webbing so you should be able to easily add more storage and organization. The Removeable Operator Pack would work quite well mounted on one of these packs.

Wiha 363 Series Torx Set

The Tactical Handyman needs to be able to work on his own tactical tools. Many of today’s tactical tools are put together using Torx fasteners. Torx fasteners are excellent because they are internal drive so your driver doesn’t slip as much and they offer more bearing surface than your typical allen screw to torque against. It is a great system, especially for the smaller fasteners found in folding knives.

In order to deal with these fasteners, you need special tools. I have owned several sets of Torx drivers and I have stripped and ruined several sets. Then I found Wiha Tools. Wiha seems to specialize in precision tools and has an especially broad selection of Torx tools.

I have been using a set of their short arm drivers from the 363 series for 2 years now and they are the best set of drivers that I have owned. These drivers have a confidence inspiring tight fit in most fasteners, a great organizer/holder, individually marked drivers, and they are very compact.

This is a tool that every Tactical Handyman needs in their tool box.

RiverofGuns.com

Some of the best places to get discounted guns, knives, and tactical gear are on the various discussion forums that are scattered around the web. Many people use these places to list their new and used gear in the hopes that you will buy it. Think of them as a classifieds section in your local paper except they reach the entire nation (and the world). There are some serious deals to be had but it can be quite time consuming to surf all of the different forums looking for your particular item.

RiverofGuns.com is a search engine that scours hundreds of forums so that you don’t have to. You simply enter what you are looking for and click search. River of Guns does the rest.

It is an invaluable tool for bargain seekers.

Gun Shop Myths: Pump the Action!

There are so many gun myths that are repeated over and over again at gun store counters, deer camps, locker rooms, and range trips. These myths are repeated so many times that eventually people accept them as fact without applying even the smallest amount of critical thought.

Few firearms, if any, seem to be surrounded by more of these myths than the shotgun. A coworker, while discussing their home defense plans at work, started talking about the “shotty” that he keeps under the bed “just in case”. It always amazes me that people are willing to discuss such things so loudly at work. I wasn’t part of the conversation but it was plainly audible throughout the whole office. It wasn’t long before that oft repeated tidbit of shotgun wisdom reared its ugly head.

“You don’t even have to shoot it, the sound of the action being pumped will send robbers running!”

What a ridiculous statement! If your plan is to scare people off with noises, buy a stereo system not a shotgun. Better yet, install a whole house entertainment system so that you can surround your midnight visitor with the sounds of shotgun actions cycling in every room! Scaring evil doers away with a sound seems like a nice tidy plan, until it doesn’t work. Shotguns are not a magic talisman that, in the stressful moment when you hear someone crashing through your window, transform you into a Spartan.

The shotgun is a viable home defense weapon (though I believe there may be better choices). As with any other piece of equipment and skill, its effective use must be learned. It is only through training and repetition that someone can learn to effectively use the shotgun (or any other gun) with an appropriate level of efficiency and violence. This level of training cannot be reached by asking the gentleman at the gun counter how to work the shotgun when you purchase it. It cannot be reached by running a box of shells through it once in a while at the range.

The sound of a shotgun’s action being cycled may or may not deter someone intent on doing harm, but it would be foolish to count on that happening. Quick and violent action by a trained individual is a far better response. Seek professional training from a respected trainer and stop repeating the silly things you heard at the gun counter!

Review: SWAT Magazine

I have never paid for a magazine subscription in my life. I have been given subscriptions as gifts, but i have never paid for one with my own money. That changed recently after reading several issues of SWAT Magazine.

SWAT is not just a gun magazine. It is a tactics and training magazine. There are reviews of training courses in just about every issue. There are amazing articles from Pat Rogers on technique and training. This magazine is for shooters, not gun owners.

The contributors really set SWAT apart. You will see names like Pat Rogers who you may know as, perhaps, the premier carbine instructors in the nation. The Pat Rogers articles alone are worth the price of admission. Jeff Randall, co-owner of ESEE Knives and premier survival/escape & evasion trainer, contributes regularly. Louis Awerbuck is in every issue. Mr. Awerbuck is one of the real thinkers in tactical training today. There are also many other well-known and influential contributors.

SWAT also is more than willing to tell its readers when a product is garbage. You simply will not find that in most magazines because they are afraid to lose an advertiser. SWAT seems to be more concerned about making sure their readers don’t buy and stake their lives on a piece of junk. That is the way it should be.

The title may be SWAT but this magazine is geared toward the civilian shooter. The editor, Denny Hanson, does an excellent job of balancing politics and gun content. He is also a constant advocate for gun rights in his editorials and responses to readers who write to the magazine.

It is truly worth your time and money to purchase and read.

Preview: Danger Close Consulting Offset Surefire Scout Mount

The Surefire M600 Scout Light is one of the most compact and lightweight rifle mounted weapon lights available. It is truly an excellent light. However, I have always had issues determining the best place to mount it since I do not care for tape switches and the standard mount places it in an uncomfortably low position for use with the support hand thumb. The Scout is a light in need of an offset mount but, until recently, no one made them.

Danger Close Consulting has filled that niche and filled it well! I have one of their mounts in hand and it is excellent.

Look for a more complete review with pictures to be posted here soon.

New Lights From Princeton Tec

Princeton Tec just added two new lights to their website. Both of the lights were shown at the 2010 SHOT Show but this is the first time I have seen detailed specs on them.

The first is the Remix Pro. The most interesting thing about this light is that it runs on a single CR123A battery. That should make it very light weight and compact. It can be had with red, green, or white 5mm LEDs and a single white Maxbright LED. I have come to appreciate a useful red light setting on a head lamp for times when I am trying not to mess up my dark adjusted vision. This light looks quite good on paper.

The second light, the MPLS, is very interesting to me. It has a mounting system that will allow it to be attached to a number of things like helmets, weapon rails, PALs webbing, etc. It has a flexible neck that allows the user to quickly aim the light to where ever it is needed. The body of the light appears to be based on the Princeton Tec Pilot which I have used as a back up light on my headlamps for years. This looks like an extremely versatile piece of gear, I just wish it took something other than coin cell batteries.

Updating the Venerable Safariland 6004

I have had my new Safariland 6004-10 Single Strap Shroud and Drop Flex Adaptor for a short time now. I am happy to report that I am very pleased so far. The set up can be made to ride slightly higher as the Safariland6280 which is great news for someone with my view of how drop leg holsters should be used.This combo may be the highest riding drop leg holster on the market.

The leg strap is my only potential problem. The entire thing is elastic. I wish it was a more static strap with only a small elastic section. However, this is a small gripe since it works well enough.

Look for a more in depth review article to be posted soon that includes ways to update your Safariland drop leg holster.

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