web analytics

Archive | The EDC Tool Roll

The EDC Tool Roll: Engineer DR-07 Twin Wrench Driver

The EDC Tool Roll is a feature on Jerking the Trigger in which we profile various every day carry worthy tools. The tools shown aren’t multi-tools but rather real tools, that by virtue of their compact size, light weight, usefulness, or unique functionality, can find a place in any range kit, emergency kit, or every day carry bag.

Feel free to comment on the tools that you carry so we can all learn! The discussion on these posts has been very valuable so far.


The Engineer DR-07 Twin Wrench Driver is my favorite screw driver solution for a compact tool kit. I’ve had it for some time now and purposely held off on mentioning it here until I could test the Tekton 14-in-1 Offset Driver as a potential lower cost alternative. While the Tekton is functional, everything about the Engineer DR-07 is a step above.

The Engineer DR-07 Twin Wrench Driver is a Japanese manufactured replaceable bit screw driver that accepts bits at either end of its “L” shaped handle. The 10 included bits and bit carrier are of excellent quality and well marked both on the bit carrier and the bits themselves. The included bits are very much like standard 1/4″ shank bits but slightly longer. However, the DR-07 will accept standard bits though they sit slightly deeper in the bit holders.

The bits are retained via a detent and spring steel collar. This set up applies solid tension even on bits that aren’t notched. The spring steel collar is thicker and provides better tension than the one found on the Tekton version. The bit holders are also magnetized which is a nice touch.

The Tekton version of this tool has a hard plastic cover on the handle but the Engineer DR-07 features a very resilient rubber handle that feels great in the hand. The rubber is molded over an entirely steel structure beneath for strength. The DR-07 also has finer knurling on the bit holders that allows good grip and fine control when turning a screw.

The beauty of this driver is the offset design. This “L” shape keeps the tool very compact but allows the user good reach and the ability to apply a lot of torque when necessary. This one is what you will find in my EDC Tool Roll more often than not. It is one of the few compact drivers that can actually reach screws like an AR-15 grip screw and still provide enough tool to hold onto when loosening or tightening the screw.

I should note that, like the previously profiled Tekton driver, this tool does NOT ratchet. For some reason, almost everyone who puts hands on this thing thinks it is going to ratchet but it does not.

Everything about this tool screams quality. The chromed finish is smooth and seemingly very durable. The bit holders have great tension and use robust parts to retain the bits. The grip is very comfortable in the hand. The included bits and bit holder are some of the nicest I’ve seen included with a tool like this. I own a handful of tools from Engineer and this is what I have come to expect from them.

Where to Buy: I’ve never seen this tool anywhere but online. I purchased mine from Amazon for around $26 shipped. It shipped from Japan which took about 3 weeks to arrive but it was worth the wait given that it is easily my favorite compact screw driver. As of the time of this writing, the price has dropped significantly to around $17 shipped on Amazon: Engineer DR-07 Twin Wrench Driver

You may also be able to find a deal on auction sites. Be advised, these will ship from Japan most of the time so expect to wait.

Alternatives: We’ve reviewed a number of other compact screw drivers in previous installments of The EDC Tool Roll (click the links below to read the reviews):

Tekton 14-in-1 Offset Screwdriver (2945) (This is nearly identical to the DR-07 but with lower, though still acceptable, quality)

Replaceable Edition Fix It Sticks

Doc Allen’s VersaTool

Wera Kraftform Kompact 25


Do you have a compact driver that you prefer or any other tool you want to recommend? Tell us about it below.

The EDC Tool Roll: Tekton 14-in-1 Offset Screwdriver

The EDC Tool Roll is a feature on Jerking the Trigger in which we profile various every day carry worthy tools. The tools shown aren’t multi-tools but rather real tools, that by virtue of their compact size, light weight, usefulness, or unique functionality, can find a place in any range kit, emergency kit, or every day carry bag.

Feel free to comment on the tools that you carry so we can all learn! The discussion on these posts has been very valuable so far.


I initially bought the Tekton 14-in-1 Offset Screwdriver (2945) because it looked like a more affordable version of one my favorite tools. It turned out to be a pretty solid tool on its own. I’ll profile the original tool in a future edition of The EDC Tool Roll.

The 14-in-1 Offset Screwdriver is a replaceable bit screwdriver that can accept bits at either end of it’s “L” shaped handle. The bits that come with it are double sided but it will also accept standard 1/4″ shank bits (they just sit a smidge deeper in the bit holder). The tool includes 7 double sided bits – hence the 14-in-1 moniker.

The bits are retained via a detent and spring steel collar. This set up applies solid tension even on bits that aren’t notched. The handle is plastic over metal with the metal seeming to run all the way through the tool. There is no flex or twisting under load so it seems that the metal shaft runs from end to end.

The beauty of this driver is the offset design. This “L” shape keeps the tool very compact but allows the user decent reach and the ability to apply a lot of torque when necessary. I find myself reaching for this tool in all kinds of situations, even when I have a tool chest full of other screw driving options. I keep this one in my range bag because it is one of the few compact drivers that can actually reach screws like an AR-15 grip screw and still provide enough tool to hold onto when loosening or tightening the screw. It’s ability to accept standard bits means I can use it on just about any fastener found on my guns.

I should note that this tool does NOT ratchet. For some reason, almost everyone who puts hands on this thing thinks it is going to ratchet but it does not. There are even people who give it poor reviews online because it doesn’t ratchet… even though the descriptions of the tool never say that it does.

I should also note that the bit holder is marginal. It holds bits but it doesn’t clip onto the tool very well which renders the pocket clip on the holder mostly useless. This wasn’t a big deal for me since I’ll never clip something like this into a pocket.

Overall, this is a very handy tool for around $10.

Where to Buy: I’ve never seen this tool or the other version of it that I use anywhere but online. I purchased mine from Amazon for $10 shipped (which is almost half what I paid for the other tool I mentioned): Tekton 14-in-1 Offset Screwdriver (2945)

Alternatives: We’ve reviewed a number of other compact screw drivers in previous installments of The EDC Tool Roll (click the links below to read the reviews):

Replaceable Edition Fix It Sticks

Doc Allen’s VersaTool

Wera Kraftform Kompact 25


Do you have a compact driver that you prefer or any other tool you want to recommend? Tell us about it below.

The EDC Tool Roll: GearWrench MicroDriver Set

The EDC Tool Roll is a feature on Jerking the Trigger in which we profile various every day carry worthy tools. The tools shown aren’t multi-tools but rather real tools, that by virtue of their compact size, light weight, usefulness, or unique functionality, can find a place in any range kit, emergency kit, or every day carry bag.

Feel free to comment on the tools that you carry so we can all learn! The discussion on these posts has been very valuable so far.


The two most popular tools that we have featured in The EDC Tool Roll so far are the Knipex Cobra Pliers and the VIM Tools HBR5 Ratchet/Driver. I know several of you have emailed me to say you picked up the HBR5 and love it (thanks for those emails by the way). I have also had a couple of emails regarding commonly seen alternatives to the HBR5 like the GearWrench MicroDriver Set that appears so similar… So, I bought one.

The ratchet that is included in the GearWrench set is remarkably similar to the HBR5 but it is slightly larger in every dimension – longer, wider, and thicker. This may be good or bad depending on your application. It is reversible via a small lever at both ends and both ends have a thumb disc just like the HBR5. One end accepts standard 1/4″ screwdriver bits. The other end accepts 5/16″ bits and you are most likely to use it with the included socket adapter since 5/16″ bits aren’t common.

The biggest difference between the GearWrench set and the HBR5 is what is included. The HBR5 is inexpensive but only comes with the ratchet and bit adapter. You have to provide all your own sockets and bits (which most of us already have around). The GearWrench set comes with a case and a selection of bits and sockets. The case is too large to EDC in a pocket but it is great for a range bag or EDC bag. If you want to add this to a small tool roll for pocket carry, you can just raid the kit for the sockets and bits that you need and carry those rather than the whole case.

Now that I have used both side by side, I can’t say that I have a strong preference for one tool over the other though the slightly smaller size of the HBR5 makes it handy in some situations. If you need a full kit, the GearWrench MicroDriver Set is probably the better choice for you. I have come to really like either of them for use in a range bag for common range tasks like assembling barricades for drills, assembling target stands, and even optic installation.

Where to Buy: My local Sears Hardware has the GearWrench MicroDrive Set on sale for less than $17 right now which is a great deal. Some of the larger automotive chains also carry GearWrench tools so they may be worth a look. You can also pick up this set on Amazon: GearWrench MicroDrive Set

Alternatives: My favorite tool of this type is the VIM Tools HBR5.

Chapman makes a number of excellent ratchet kits with similar functionality but they use proprietary bits. Stanley also makes a kit under both the Stanley and Bostitch brands that you can find at some Wal-Marts. Finally, a reader named Brian recommended the Tekton 1485 bit ratchet which could work if you like a padded handle. Thanks Brian!

Thanks again to everyone for all the emails and comments. You’ve really had some great tips.


Do you have compact bit ratchet that you prefer or another EDC worthy tool you would like to recommend? Tell us about it below.

The EDC Tool Roll: Adjustable Wrench Comparison – Knipex Pliers Wrench, Channellock 804, Lobster Shorty

The EDC Tool Roll is a feature on Jerking the Trigger in which we profile various every day carry worthy tools. The tools shown aren’t multi-tools but rather real tools, that by virtue of their compact size, light weight, usefulness, or unique functionality, can find a place in any range kit, emergency kit, or every day carry bag.

Feel free to comment on the tools that you carry so we can all learn! The discussion on these posts has been very valuable so far.


We compared the various pliers options in a recent edition of The EDC Tool Roll and that lead to a handful of emails asking for a comparison of the adjustable wrench options that we have covered so far. Most of the emails were basically asking if the Knipex Pliers Wrench was worth the cost over the other options. That is a personal decision but, hopefully, this comparison can better equip you to make that call.

Check out the earlier entries on the specific tools in this comparison for background:

This comparison is not even really close on functionality. The Knipex Pliers Wrench has a trick up it’s sleeve that a standard adjustable wrench can’t match but they also cost more than twice as much as either of the other two options profiled here. The truth is, if you just need an adjustable wrench for your range kit, any of these will do.

Quality – All three of these options are very high quality and will likely be heirloom tools if you don’t abuse them. The Lobster Shorty is an extremely high quality adjustable wrench with nearly perfectly flush jaws, polished flats, and smooth adjustment. The Knipex Pliers Wrench is everything you expect from Knipex. There is no clear winner here between the Lobster Shorter and Knipex Pliers Wrench. The Channellock 804 lags behind a bit but it is no slouch in the quality department.

Features and Functionality – All three options have the same basic functions of adjustable parallel jaws but the Knipex Pliers Wrench goes beyond that basic adjustable wrench functionality. They offer easier, push-button adjustment and the ability to “ratchet” by simply loosening your grip as you reset the jaws on the fastener. This makes them 3-4 times faster to use than the other options when turning the same bolt. The Knipex Pliers Wrench is the clear winner on features.

Size – The Knipex Pliers Wrench is the largest in the bunch but it also boasts the largest capacity jaws. The Lobster Shorty is the shortest wrench in the bunch but still boasts surprising jaw capacity. The Channellock 804 is the smallest and lightest overall tool in this comparison. All three of them are easily pocketable.

Price – This is where the Knipex Pliers Wrench looses some of its luster. They will typically set you back around $47 – $55. Sometimes you can find a deal that is lower but there is no way around the fact that this is an expensive tool. I found the functionality that the tool offers to be worth it so I paid the price. The Lobster Shorty will run around $20 – $24. The Channellock 804 is around $18. Typically, the Knipex Pliers Wrench is more than twice the price of the other options.

How to Choose – If you need the smallest and lightest adjustable wrench for a very compact kit, the Channellock 804 is the one for you. If you want an adjustable wrench that is small enough to carry but offers plenty of versatility due to it’s disproportionate jaw capacity, the Lobster Shorty is an amazing EDC wrench. If you like the finer things and appreciate the ratcheting functionality, the Knipex Pliers Wrenches are amazing tools. I carry the Knipex Pliers Wrench and occasionally the Lobster Shorter to go with it since you often need two wrenches instead of just one.

Where to Buy – You can almost certainly find the Channellock 804 locally. The Lobster Shorty is imported from Japan so it is usually only available online (Ebay often has the best deal). You may be able to find the Knipex Pliers Wrench locally but the small version profiled here is unlikely to be found at a box store. Online is likely your best bet.

Here are links directly to the tools on Amazon:

Knipex Pliers Wrench on Amazon

Lobster Shorty on Amazon

Channellock 804 and 804N on Amazon


There are a number of compact adjustable wrenches on the market at a variety of price points. Do you have one that we should try? Tell us about it below.

The EDC Tool Roll: Wera Kraftform Kompact 25 Screwdriver

The EDC Tool Roll is a feature on Jerking the Trigger in which we profile various every day carry worthy tools. The tools shown aren’t multi-tools but rather real tools, that by virtue of their compact size, light weight, usefulness, or unique functionality, can find a place in any range kit, emergency kit, or every day carry bag.

Feel free to comment on the tools that you carry so we can all learn! The discussion on these posts has been very valuable so far.


There are times when only a full size screw driver will do but, they can be a little awkward and a little dangerous to carry in a pocket. That is where the Wera Kraftform Kompact 25 Screwdriver comes in. This handy little bugger has some tricks up its sleeve that make it both pocketable and long enough to reach an AR-15 grip screw.

The Kraftform Kompact 25 features what Wera calls a “Bayonet Blade” meaning that the shaft can be depressed and locked into the handle. The screwdriver made be used in this compact mode or the user can press the collar to instantly deploy the full length driver shaft under spring tension. Pressing the collar down again when the Bayonet Blade is extended allows it to be removed from the handle completely for use as a bit adapter for a drill or impact driver.

There is another feature that keeps this screwdriver compact for carry. It has the ability to store 6 bits inside the handle. There are bits included or you can substitute any of your own standard 1/4″ hex shank bits. The bits are carried in a compartment that is accessed by pressing a button on the butt of the handle. The handled snaps open under spring tension when the button is pressed.

Wera’s bit holder design is the best I’ve used. There is no play or wobble when the bit is installed. You simply press the bit into the holder to capture it or pull up on the free-spinning collar to release it. The collar spins so that you can place your fingers there to stabilize a screw or bolt while you drive it which can really come in handy if you have the space to use such a feature.

This has become my favorite screwdriver to have on hand when I am working around our homestead or on the shooting range. It is the only driver that I have found that can be both pocketable and large enough to do the work of a full size screwdriver. It’s size means I can actually reach and then apply appropriate torque to an AR-15 grip screw which is just about impossible with any other multitool or EDC oriented screwdriver.

I should note that while this is considerably more compact than a full size screwdriver, the handle still has some bulk. It is pocketable but, if you were going to carry it for EDC, you would probably want to keep it in your pack most of the time. It does fit inside both the Triple Seven Gear Micro Kit and Maxpedition Micro Pocket Organizer “tool rolls” that we have profiled in this series.

Where to Buy: I can’t find these in any brick and mortar store in my area but there are a handful of sources online. It is worth shopping around for the best price. Ebay sellers often have good prices on these. When I purchased mine a couple of years ago, Amazon was the best choice: Wera Kraftform Kompact 25 on Amazon

Alternatives: I haven’t found a true alternative for this since it is essentially a full size driver that packs small enough to carry, but we have profiled other drivers on The EDC Tool Roll that I know work well:


Do you have a compact driver that you prefer? Tell us about it below.

The EDC Tool Roll: Doc Allen’s VersaTool

The EDC Tool Roll is a feature on Jerking the Trigger in which we profile various every day carry worthy tools. The tools shown aren’t multi-tools but rather real tools, that by virtue of their compact size, light weight, usefulness, or unique functionality, can find a place in any range kit, emergency kit, or every day carry bag.

Feel free to comment on the tools that you carry so we can all learn! The discussion on these posts has been very valuable so far.


I’ve owned a Doc Allen’s Versatool for more than 12 years. I bought it while I was in college and have been using it ever since.

The VersaTool consists of 3 main parts and several accessories. There is a bit adapter that allows it to accept standard 1/4″ hex bits. The bit driver is attached to a 1/4″ socket adapter so that when the bit adapter is removed, you can install 1/4″ drive sockets. Finally, the socket adapter is attached to a steel loop for a handle with detents in several positions. This configuration allow the VersaTool to be set up inline like a typical screw driver, like a t-handle screw driver, like an offset handle screwdriver for the most torque, or fold neatly in half for storage.

Even after all this time, I still like this tool. It packs small thanks to its folding design but it can still offer reach similar to a full size screwdriver if you use the extension. The offset handle position is angled slightly which makes it comfortable and easy to put a lot more torque into a faster than you typically can with compact bit driver. The ability to use sockets is a huge plus.

The tool also includes a number of bits in a bit carrier, a bit extension, and a small black pouch to carry it all. The quality seems to be very good. Everything is made of steel and mine still works like new after 12 years.

Where to Buy: I purchased mine from CountyComm. They only carry the “Pro” version but the only difference appears to be the addition of some extra bits and another bit carrier. The price is right at less than $11 and I can never resist picking up a few other gadgets when I order from CountyComm.

Alternatives: I carry my Fix It Sticks (click to read about them on The EDC Tool Roll) more often than any other dedicated driver now. I like the ability to store 4 bits on the tool and switch between them extremely quickly.


Do you have a compact driver that you prefer? Tell us about it below.

The EDC Tool Roll: Pliers Comparison – Knipex Cobra, Channellock 424, and Tekton 37521

The EDC Tool Roll is a feature on Jerking the Trigger in which we profile various every day carry worthy tools. The tools shown aren’t multi-tools but rather real tools, that by virtue of their compact size, light weight, usefulness, or unique functionality, can find a place in any range kit, emergency kit, or every day carry bag.

Feel free to comment on the tools that you carry so we can all learn! The discussion on these posts has been very valuable so far.


You ask, JTT delivers. This post will serve as a comparison between the 3 pliers that we have profiled so far in The EDC Tool Roll series. You can check out their earlier reviews below for more background:

Knipex Cobra 125

Channellock 424 and Tekton 37521

This isn’t really going to be a fair comparison because the Knipex Cobras smoke the other pliers in this list on everything except price but that doesn’t mean the others are useless or junk. In fact, the Tekton 37521 might be one of the best values we have profiled so far.

Quality – The Knipex Cobras are plainly the highest quality pliers in the bunch. They are beautifully drop forged, perfectly ground, and have knife-hard jaws that grip tenaciously. Then I think the Tekton Pliers, which are made in the USA, win out over the Channellocks on the strength of the Tekton’s adjustable pivot which make them feel tighter.

Features – The Knipex Cobras are feature rich, while the others are straight forward and functional. The Knipex pliers have very hard jaws with teeth that are set opposed to the direction that you turn the pliers which allows them to actually lock into whatever you are trying to turn. They also have a massive adjustment range and large jaws which is key for EDC pliers – something that needs to be small enough to carry but versatile enough (and large enough) to use on a variety of fasteners.

The Tektons are only slightly larger than the Channellock 424s but that little but of extra bulk gives you larger jaws, more comfortable grips, and a more functional adjustable pivot. The Tektons take second place on features.

Size – The Channellock 424s are the smallest and lightest pliers in this comparison. The Tektons and Knipex Cobras are similar in size with the Tekton pliers being ever so slightly larger in most dimensions. As mentioned above, the Knipex Cobras have the largest jaws by a long shot. All three of them are easily pocketable.

Price – This is where the Tekton and Channellock come out ahead of the Knipex Cobras. The Channellock 424 cost around $12-14, the Tekton 37521 are usually $10-12, and the Knipex Cobras come in at a hefty $28-38 (I’ve seen them lower but you’ll have to really shop around). I’ve purchased all three and I believe the Knipex Cobras justify their price. There is just nothing else like them and I am willing to pay for that. However, if you can’t stomach the Knipex price, the Tektons are a smoking deal.

How to Choose – If you absolutely need the smallest and lightest pliers for your kit, get the Channellock 424. If you want EDC pliers that can do anything small pliers can do but can be pressed into the work of larger pliers, choose the Knipex. If you want the best value on a capable pair of pliers for your EDC tool kit, the Tektons wins.

Where to Buy – Channellock are almost certainly available at a hardware store near you. Tektons are sold almost exclusively online. Knipex can sometimes be found at Sears Hardware or other stores but online is likely your best bet. All three are available from Amazon:

Knipex Cobra 87 01 125

Channellock 424 on Amazon

Tekton 37521 on Amazon


There are a number of 4.5-5″ adjustable pliers on the market from Irwin and others. Do you have compact adjustable pliers that you prefer? Tell us about it below.

The EDC Tool Roll: Knipex CoBolt Cutters

The EDC Tool Roll is a feature on Jerking the Trigger in which we profile various every day carry worthy tools. The tools shown aren’t multi-tools but rather real tools, that by virtue of their compact size, light weight, usefulness, or unique functionality, can find a place in any range kit, emergency kit, or every day carry bag.

Feel free to comment on the tools that you carry so we can all learn! The discussion on these posts has been very valuable so far.


Today’s tool in The EDC Tool Roll series will be a little bit of a departure in that it will not fit completely in most pockets though it is still very easy to carry compared to similar tools. The Knipex CoBolt Cutter series of tools are the kind of tools that appeal to anyone concerned about being prepared for emergencies and they are exceedingly easy to carry compared to even the smallest traditional bolt cutters.

The Knipex CoBolt Cutters feature a compound leverage hinge and are most commonly available with an 8″ overall length (though there is a 10″ version that is harder to find and more expensive). They are basically a pair of compound leverage bolt cutters that are no larger than most pairs of diagnal pliers/wire cutters.

Unlike many larger bolt cutters, most of which are very poorly made, the CoBolt Cutters feature cutting edges that are hardened to 64 HRC. That is as hard as a high end knife. The cutting edge is so hard and the compound leverage is so effective that you will be surprised with what you can cut. I’ve cut small to medium padlocks (especially cheaper locks that aren’t hardened), all kinds of  fencing and heavy wire, large nails and screws, chain, even a sling stud that was too long during a recent installation on a Ruger 10/22 stock. The applications for carrying one of set of these in an urban BOB are nearly endless. You can cut your way into and out of trouble with relative ease.

The CoBolt Cutters are available in a number of different versions but the basic version is my favorite. The Knipex 71 01 200 is the most common model and likely the most versatile. I also have a version that is identical except the jaws are notched to allow them to cut larger diameter stock at the highest leverage point (Model 71 31 200). CoBolt Cutters are also available with angled heads, molded grips, and countless other versions but, again, the basic model is the most versatile (and most affordable).

Where to Buy: Knipex CoBolt Cutters are commonly used in trades so they turn up regularly on Ebay in decent used condition. I’ve purchased both of mine this way and paid less than $15 each. As long as the cutting edges are in good shape and they aren’t pitted, they clean up easily with some oil and a Scotch-Brite pad.

If you can’t find a used pair or you prefer to buy at a brick and mortar, Sears Hardware usually has the basic model at a decent price. Otherwise, Amazon is a great place to buy: Knipex 71 01 20 CoBolt

You can explore all the available CoBolt cutters here.

Alternatatives: I don’t really know of a true alternative for the CoBolt Cutters. I guess a pair of folding compact bolt cutters would be the closest but even those will be considerably larger and likely more expensive for a decent example.


If you have a tool you can recommend, tell us about it below. The comments have been a valuable source of information in this series.

The EDC Tool Roll: Maxpedition Micro Pocket Organizer

The EDC Tool Roll is a feature on Jerking the Trigger in which we profile various every day carry worthy tools. The tools shown aren’t multi-tools but rather real tools, that by virtue of their compact size, light weight, usefulness, or unique functionality, can find a place in any range kit, emergency kit, or every day carry bag.

Feel free to comment on the tools that you carry so we can all learn! The discussion on these posts has been very valuable so far.


As much as I prefer the Triple 7 Gear line of pocket organizers, their availability has been a intermittent and several of you have asked for alternatives. Maxpedition seemed like the easy choice with their long history of EDC organizers and it turns out that they offer one of the only other truly pocketable pocket organizers on the market… which is kind of ironic. I don’t know who has pockets large enough to fit some of the so-called “pocket” organizers out there but it isn’t me.

The Maxpedition Micro Pocket Organizer is the smallest (5.5″ x 3.5″ x 1″) in their extensive line of pocket organizers and it is completely sufficient for me. The pouch has a clamshell design that is closed with a perimeter zipper. The front exterior of the pouch has a mesh slip pocket and the rear has a small grab handle. The interior of the pouch has 5 elastic loops, a slip pocket on each side, and a small loop for attaching a lanyard.

The quality is typical Maxpedition so it should last a long time. I prefer this organizer to others in their line due to its small size and because it isn’t festooned with belt loops and PALS webbing that I will never use. It’s the simplest and most compact they offer, which is exactly why I prefer it.

Where to Buy: Maxpedition products are available all over the place. If you local gun store carries them, buy there. They can probably use the business these day! If not, Amazon is a good stand by: Maxpedition Micro Pocket Organizer on Amazon

Alternatives: My favorite pocket organizer is the Triple 7 Gear Micro Kit which is great, made in the USA gear, if you can catch them in stock. Maxpedition also makes the Mini Pocket Organizer and EDC Pocket Organizer that might still fit in some pockets. They are larger than the Micro but offer more organization features.

If you have an organizer, tool roll, or other tool that you can recommend, tell us about it below. The comments have been a valuable source of information in this series.


Contents in the image above:

The EDC Tool Roll: VIM Tools HBR5 Ratchet

The EDC Tool Roll is a feature on Jerking the Trigger in which we profile various every day carry worthy tools. The tools shown aren’t multi-tools but rather real tools, that by virtue of their compact size, light weight, usefulness, or unique functionality, can find a place in any range kit, emergency kit, or every day carry bag.

Feel free to comment on the tools that you carry so we can all learn! The discussion on these posts has been very valuable so far.


I used to have a small ratchet from Home Depot’s Husky line that I found extremely useful for its small size and versatility. I gave it to a friend thinking I could just buy another one but when I tried, I found that they had changed the tool. Fortunately, I came across the same ratchet under a different brand name – the VIM Tools HBR5.

The HBR5 is an extremely compact and thin ratchet that can be used with both bits and sockets. One side accepts any standard driver 1/4″ driver bit. The other side is a 5/16″ hex that comes with a removable 1/4″ socket adapter installed. Both ends are reversible and have a textured speed wheel for turning the bits or sockets with your fingers. The ends are offset and have 52 tooth ratchet mechanisms that require a short 7 degree sweep.

There are similar ratchets available with finer toothed mechanisms but I have never found anything that is is quite as thin and compact as the HBR5. At 4.5″ long it is easy to carry in your pocket or range bag and long enough to apply solid torque on fasteners. It is thin enough to get into places that don’t have room for a traditional driver. The ratchet ends are the pass-through type so even with a bit installed, the tool is very low profile.

The HBR5 is easily the best tool of its type that I have tried and is one of my all time favorite tools. It splits its time between my EDC kit where it is used mostly as a bit driver with an extension and my range bag where it is kept with two Altoids tins full of 1/4″ Craftsman sockets.

Where to Buy: These used to be available in the Husky line at Home Depot and they still offer a similar tool but it is larger, thicker, and feels more coarse. The only place I have ever seen VIM Tools is online. I purchased mine at Amazon: VIM Tools HBR5 at Amazon

Alternatives: There are a number of bit ratchets on the market but I haven’t found any that are as refined as the HBR5. Chapman makes a number of excellent ratchet kits with similar functionality but they use proprietary bits. Gearwrench makes a similar tool in kit form but the tool itself is thicker. Stanley also makes a kit under both the Stanley and Bostitch brands that you can find at some Wal-Marts but again, it’s thickness makes it less useful. Finally, a reader named Brian recommended the Tekton 1485 bit ratchet which could work if you like a padded handle. Thanks Brian!

Do you have compact bit ratchet that you prefer or another tool you would like to recommend? Tell us about it below.

Powered by WordPress. Designed by Woo Themes

%d bloggers like this: