Defiance

I am not a movie critic. In fact, if I am seeing a movie, there is a good chance that it has already been out on DVD for a few years. However, I had to write about this one.

Tonight my wife and I watched the movie Defiance starring Daniel Craig. It is based on the astounding true story of the Bielski Partisans during WWII. The real story of what these courageous people went through is more astounding than any Hollywood writer would dare to create.

The Bielski Partisans were named for the Bielski brothers. Under their leadership more than 1200 Jews survived WWII by living in the woods. They didn’t just survive in the woods. They thrived. The group was able to build a mill, a clinic, and even class rooms in dug out structures.

These people chose to risk their lives to live free and they chose to fight rather than cower. They gave up their comfort in order to gain their freedom. I wonder if we, as Americans, could make the same choice. I wonder if I could make the same choice.

What an amazing story.

Update…

Many of the posts that I have put up so far are reviews that I have written over the years on various forums. Most of what I will post from now on will be new material.

Some topics that I hope to cover:

  • Painting Your Gear
  • Kifaru Molle Express Review
  • Kifaru ZXR Review
  • NovaTac 120T Review
  • Princeton Tec Quad Tactical Review
  • HSGI Bleeder Pouch Review
  • Trijicon TA11-G ACOG
  • Bringing the AK up to Date

Evolution of a Knife Design

A few years ago Ray Laconico introduced a knife design called the “Explorer” and it was immediately successful. I believe it was one off the first “patterns” that Ray offered consistently. Ray introduced the knife in this BladeForums thread.

This will not be a true review but rather a window in the processes that a knife maker goes through to improve a product. I find it pretty fascinating. The mark of a good knife maker is a continual drive to improve designs based on feedback from users and their own experiences.

Stats
Ray is a true custom maker so the dimensions can vary by customer request. However, his pattern knives like the Explorer tend to be similar from knife to knife. The Explorer features a blade that is 5 1/2″ from tip the scale. Overall length is about 10 1/2″. It is made from 1/4″ thick 5160 steel and wears black micarta slab handles.

The Same but Different

The Explorer’s striking looks come from it’s angular handle and tall, slightly drop point blade (or recurve on the original) with some extreme belly near the tip. This nearly straight spine blade profile and distal taper give the knife a very fine point. None of the recognizable features of the original have changed. All of the usefulness and quality of the original is built right into the newest iteration.

The butt of the knife has been made more perpendicular to the spine. This makes the knife more useful as an improvised hammer.

The slightly thicker handle slabs are now more contoured. This gives the very angular looking grip a more organic feel in the hand. The grip on the original Explorer was excellent but this new one will blow you away. You will also find that the new grip is slightly taller and more hand filling.

Ray also changed the design off the guard to be smaller and less obtrusive. The original guard on my Explorer used to rub my knuckle a bit until I broke its edges with some wet-dry sand paper. The new guard is hardly noticeable while still being very effective. If you like a guard on your knives, you will like this one.

My favorite modification of the design is that Ray moved the edge MUCH closer to the handle. This allows for much more powerful cuts while doing tasks like notching and whittling.

The Laconico Explorer is a fine knife for those who favor a larger and thicker knife. There is not much penalty in cutting performance from the thicker stock thanks to Ray’s tall flat grinds and polished convex edge. This knife will shave hair easily and push cut newsprint. Thanks to its thick spine and differentially tempered 5160 steel and can take a serious beating. I tend to favor thinner knives but I do appreciate having thicker ones at times – especially they cut as well as this one.

Overall, the new Explorer is a worthy successor to the original.

Button Compasses: Use With Caution!

I learned a lesson today. Thankfully it wasn’t a hard lesson.

I have been wearing a Suunto Clipper on my watch band for a while now. It has generally worked well and the luminous bezel has come in handy when I need a quick direction check in the dark. Everything was fineĀ  until today I glanced down at it while at the office and noticed that it was facing the exact opposite direction that it should be. The north marker was pointed south.

At first I thought that it was just the computer on my desk or perhaps my filing cabinet throwing it off. I stepped away from my desk and it was still way off. When I packed up and left for the day, I checked it outside wondering if there could have been something in the building throwing the compass off. No luck, it was still 180 degrees off outside.

I thought about the situation on my drive home and realized that it could have been my wallet throwing it off. My wallet has a magnetic money clip built in. It is great because it keeps the wallet slim. Sure enough, after passing the compass over the magnet on my wallet, the needle suddenly righted itself. Then I flipped the compass over and ran its face over the magnet. It pointed south again. So simply by varying the way in which I passed the compass over the magnet, I could reliably make my compass point south and then make it point north again.

Lessons Learned:

1. Have a plan B (and maybe even a C, D, E, F, etc). If this had been the only way for me to find direction in my “tool box” in a bad situation, I would have been in trouble. At least learn how to tell rough directions without the aid of a compass so that you can verify that your compass is working properly.

2. Keep your compasses away from magnets!

CLB Designed Boker Plus Keycom

Boker Plus Keycom Review



The Details

The Keycom has been out for more than a year and I have had this one for quite some time. It is another Chad Los Banos design that is manufactured by Boker in their Boker Plus line. The Keycom features a 1 1/2″ AUS8 blade. It is just longer than 2 1/4″ long when closed and about 3 3/4″ long when opened. It weighs in at a scant 1.4 ounces. You can read these dimensions all you want, but nothing will prepare you for just how small the Keycom truely is.


Shown with an SnG for scale

The Keycom has a black FRN (fiber reinforced plastic stuff) scales that is textured similarly to G-10. It is attractive and provides good grip. The frame lock side is steel and sports a very secure pocket clip set up for tip down carry.


Frame lock scale and pocket clip

The blade can best be described as a clip point. It is made from very thin stock and is flat ground which renders a very thin edge that cuts like a laser. The edge is offset to the grip which is very nice in a knife this small. It features spine jimping and a thumb stud for righties only.


The Keycom features a clip point blade

Fit and Finish
If you have owned any of the Boker/CLB designs you are already familiar with the excellent level of fit and finish that these knives offer. These knives are an excellent value. The Keycom features all screw construction. The blade comes out off the box shaving sharp. All metal surfaces are nicely bead blasted. The frame lock is fit perfectly with very early lock up.


Perfectly fit lock with very early lock up

As I stated earlier, the blade came shaving sharp. I immediately laid it on some 2000 grit wet/dry sandpaper and finished on a strop. It went from shaving sharp to molecule splitting sharp in short order. The AUS8 takes a startlingly fine edge very quickly and holds it reasonably well. Steels like this make me wonder if super steels are even worth my time.

How does it work?
I purchased this because I wanted a small blade that could be carried as a back up to a much larger knife like an SnG or SMF. I needed something that was small but still usable for those times when I did not necessarily produce a large folder for a small cutting task. Also, I needed a knife suitable for zombie squirrel combat and leprechaun deanimation. The Keycom delivers.

It is usable thanks to Chad’s command of ergonomics. The knife has a small cutout in the grip that allows the forefinger to nestle in securely. Jimping on the spine locks the thumb in place. This allows for a very secure grip for power cuts. A small lanyard would provide something for your ring and pinky fingers to hang onto but it isn’t necessary.


Locked into the grip – note the fine jimping on the spine of the blade

When you need precision over power you can run your forefinger out onto the spine of the blade. Here you will find that the nicely shaped clip will make a perfect finger rest for fine work. The tip is very controllable in this grip.


The “clip” is the perfect place to rest your forefinger for fine work

The Keycom comes with a split ring for key chain carry but I do not care for knives that are tied to a key ring. I feel that this knife really comes into it’s own when it is clipped in your pocket. This knife will disappear in most any pair of jean’s coin pocket. I like to carry mine in the coin pocket with my SnG or SMF in my main pocket. The Keycom is so small and light that it is easily carried as a companion to larger folders.


Disappearsin a coin pocket

The only complaint I have is that it can be tricky to open. However, this is not a true criticism since it should be expected with a folder this small. Compromises must be made when you makes a knife so small.

Overall
I could not be more pleased with this knife. I paid less than $18 for this knife including shipping. You can’t beat that with a stick. This would make a great addition to a Altoids tin kit or your key chain. It offers an incredible value, it cuts like crazy, it absolutely disappears in your pocket, it is secure in the grip and is very controllable. I haven’t even mentioned the best part yet…

The best part about this knife is that it looks like a tiny elephant peaking out of your pocket… maybe.


Is that an elephant in your pocket or…

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