Archive | Be Heard

Be Heard: Gear So Good You Have More Than One?

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I have a lot of gear I like enough that I end up purchasing more than one. For instance, just about everyone of my AR-15s have a Battle Arms Development – Ambidextrous Safety Selector on them including my S&W M&P 15-22 rimfire training carbine (pic below). Most of my Glocks have Vickers Magazine Releases. I have a ton of Aimpoints spread over a variety of different types of carbines. I purchased 2 Blue Force Gear Micro Packs (thank goodness I did because they are gone forever now!) and I have 3 different ESEE-3 knives attached to various pieces of gear. When I find something that works, I like to stick with it.

Do you like to by multiples of gear that works well for you? What gear do you have that works so well for you that you end up with multiples? This is your chance to Be Heard. Leave a comment below to join the conversation.

BAD ASS MP 1522

Be Heard: To Sling or Not to Sling Your Home Defense Long Gun

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I recently had a conversation with a friend regarding whether or not it is prudent to keep a sling on a long gun that is dedicated for home defense use. This is the long gun that you would grab immediately when you hear a “bump in the night.”

Should a home defense long gun have a sling attached to it or not? Why? Does it make a difference whether it is a shotgun or a rifle? Does your location make a difference?

I honestly haven’t given this much thought until it came up with my friend. So, now I am turning it over to you. Convince me one way or the other. This is your chance to Be Heard. Leave a comment below to join the conversation.

To sling or not to sling? That is the question.

Be Heard: “High Capacity” Magazines

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Mag Caps - AR Mag

I recently posted an article that outlined 3 practical reasons that we actually do need what the media call “high capacity” magazines. It was well received and I heard from a couple of you that you were able to talk with people you know using the points in the article to make people really think about the issue.

The response to the article made me curious about how you respond to the question “Why does anyone need more than 10 rounds in a magazine?” So, how do you respond?

Now is your chance to Be Heard! Leave a comment below to join the conversation.

Be Heard: Do You Care About Balance?

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I recently heard a shooter talking about the “balance” of his new carbine. He didn’t like how front heavy it was so he was shopping for heavier stocks to “even it out.” Someone else chimed in and said that he shouldn’t seek too even out the balance since because a front heavy rifle “settles better.”

How much do you pay attention to the balance of a rifle – specifically a self-defense type carbine? If balance concerns you, do you prefer front heavy, rear heavy, or neutral balance? Do you choose components based on how they will impact the balance of your rifle?

This is your chance to Be Heard. Leave a comment below to join the conversation.

Be Heard: How Do You Zero Your AR-15?

I always find it fascinating to discuss how shooters zero their AR-15s, especially experienced shooters. The 2 most common methods that I come across are the 100 meter zero and the 50/200 meter (or yard) zero. I find it fascinating because this is one of those issues where both sides are right. Both choices will work well for a shooter who has trained enough to know where their carbine will print at various ranges. Both choices have proponents that can put forth convincing arguments.

Often this choice is dictated by the optic on one’s rifle, the available space at the range the shooter uses most often, or the skill level of the shooter. Optics with some form of bullet drop compensation will usually need to be zeroed for 100 meters. 50 yard ranges are more common than 100 yard ranges which can lead to a 50/200 yard zero out of necessity and some shooters may not be up to the task of getting a rock solid 100 yard zero. Then there are the shooters who have the skill, equipment, and facility to execute either option and choose one based on the merits of the concept or the realities of how they use (or plan to use) the carbine.

This is your chance to Be Heard. How do you zero your AR-15 and why do you choose to do it that way? What factors went into your decision making process?

Leave a comment below to Be Heard!

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