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Tag Archives | Streamlight

Review: Streamlight Microstream USB

I’ll spoil this review right up front. I really, really like my Streamlight Microstream USB.

Overview

The Microstream USB is an extremely compact LED light. It features a tail switch, a two way pocket clip (that is removable and replaceable), and two output settings (250 lumens for 1.5 hours and 50 lumens for 3.5 hours). This light is USB rechargable via a USB-C cord (included). It is less than 4″ long, barely wider than a AAA battery, and weighs a little more than 1 ounce.

The Microstream USB is available in a number of anodized colors but I recommend the FDE version because it is the only one that gives you the high output mode on the first click. The other colors (Black, Blue, Red) activate the 50 lumen mode on the first click.

Observations from Use

I normally prefer single output lights for EDC but the Microstream USB gets a pass. Streamlight designed it so that you could only access the 50 lumen low mode with a very fast double click. You can execute typical low light techniques without ever dropping into the 50 lumen mode. The user interface is dead simple and well designed.

The power to weight ratio on this light is incredible. It is so small and so lightweight that you will never leave it at home. It still has large light features like 250 lumen output and a tail switch in spite of that small size.

I typically carry a USB backup battery both at the office and on the trail. That makes it easy to keep this light up and running no matter where I am.

The light is recharged by sliding the bezel up to reveal the USB-C port and a small charge indicating LED (red for charging, green for charged). This sliding collar is o-ring sealed and it seams to do a good job given that my light has been through the wash with no ill effects. Still, this is the source of my major criticism of the light. I wish that this was sliding collar was threaded so that it had to be screwed down over the o-ring. This would make it even less likely to have water ingress. As it stands now, the user will have to keep a sharp eye on the o-ring to ensure that it is in good shape.

Wrap Up

This light is a tiny power house. I have larger lights with more output that I can can carry but this light is so small, lightweight, useful, and cheap to operate that I often carry it as a backup or even my primary light. It’s affordable too (less than $30)!

Have I said that I really, really like this light?

I had trouble finding the FDE anodized version when I bought mine last year. Now they are much easier to find. I purchased mine at Amazon who happened to be one the only places that had them in stock at the time: Streamlight Microstream USB on Amazon

Review: Streamlight TLR-7

Streamlight’s TLR-7 is their first entry into the compact, EDC weapon light market that has come about recently. Most of the lights in this space are giving up something in terms of output, runtime, and ergonomics to their full size counterparts. The best lights try to balance all of these factors. How well does the TLR-7 balance all of these considerations? Let’s dig in.

Specs:

  • Weight: 2.41 ounces
  • Length: 2.1″
  • Width: 1.2″
  • Output: 500 lumens
  • Runtime: 1.5 hours
  • Battery: 1x CR123A

Observations from Use

I will say up front that I really like this light with one caveat. Unfortunately, that caveat may be a big one for some shooters.The TLR-7 is the right kind of compact. It is built around a single CR123A battery and closely matches the width of many popular modern handguns. It isn’t just easy to carry. It’s very comfortable to carry. By matching the width of most handguns, Streamlight has made a light that can actually make your handgun MORE comfortable to carry. The holsters for this light, with something like a Glock, are often very flat and slab-like which seems to reduce hot spots… for me at least.

The output (500 lumens) and runtime (1.5 hours) are great and Streamlight nailed the beam shape. Some compact weapon lights have beams that are obviously very slanted toward illuminating objects at close range. This isn’t necessarily a bad thing but Streamlight has developed a very balanced beam pattern for the TLR-7 that offers a broad and bright hotspot with a generous spill beam. It is a great compromise between an “across the room” beam and an “across the parking garage” beam.

The TLR-7’s mounting system is solid, low profile, and adaptable. It comes with a variety of cross bars to accommodate just about any handgun. The locking disk can be turned with a flat blade screwdriver or an improvised item like a coin.

I especially like the lockout bezel feature on the TLR-7. Most light makers just tell you to back the bezel off the light in order to prevent accidental activation during storage or transport. Streamlight actually installed a tactile detent on the TLR-7 so you can feel when you hit the lock out point and the bezel is then less likely to back itself off any further during transport.

And now for the caveat… Streamlight designed this light to be compact and as you might expect, it’s activation paddles are also compact. Unfortunately, some users will find them too compact and difficult to reach. I lock the support hand wrist which places my thumb forward and high. Reaching the paddles and pushing them forward is not difficult for me with my medium sized hands… but it definitely isn’t as easy as a full sized weapon light. If your hands are smaller or your grip places your thumb further back on the grip, you may have difficulty operating this light.

I strongly recommend getting your hands on one these lights before you buy to ensure that it will work for you. If it does, I think you will be really pleased with it. I have just over 1200 rounds through my G19 with this light mounted with about 450 of those while actively testing the light. The light is working like second-nature to me with minimal adjustment to my grip but it is easy to for me to see how this might not ever work for some people.

Wrap Up

The TLR-7 offers a LOT of performance for a compact weapon light. The output and beam shape are excellent. The lock out feature is well executed and clever. If your grip and hand size will accommodate this light, I think it is a fine choice.

Streamlight.com

The EDC Tool Roll: Streamlight Bandit Headlamp

The EDC Tool Roll is a feature on Jerking the Trigger in which we profile various every day carry worthy tools. The tools shown aren’t multi-tools but rather real tools, that by virtue of their compact size, light weight, usefulness, or unique functionality, can find a place in any range kit, emergency kit, or every day carry bag.

Feel free to comment on the tools that you carry so we can all learn! The discussion on these posts has been very valuable so far.


I don’t know about where you live, but my official sunset time is already before 4PM and it is going to be that way for a long time. I also live in a very rural location so when the sun sets, it gets DARK. That means I put a lot of miles on flashlights, work lights, and especially head lamps. I’ve come to realize that the beam profile I need while working is different the beam profile I need when I am on the trail. When it come to work, I need a beam that is broad and bright – basically a wall of light that covers everything with light at arms length from one edge of my vision to the other. That is exactly what the Streamlight Bandit provides… and it does it with style and a great price.

The Bandit might be the ultimate pocketable work light. It is compact enough to fit in The EDC Tool Roll and light weight enough in weight to wear for hours (1.3 ounces!). It has a polycarbonate body with a removeable bracket that serves as both an attachment point for the head strap and a clip for attaching the Bandit to the brim of a cap, lip of a pocket, some helmets or even just free standing on the ground or other surface.

It is USB rechargable which is incredible for someone who uses their headlamp as much as I do. This light contains sealed 450-mAh lithium polymer battery that provides 2 hours of runtime at 180 lumens or 9+ hours at 35 lumens. There is also a blinking mode which I never use.

The user interface is simple enough. There is one button. Push it once for low and again within a couple of seconds for high, then blink. After a few seconds, the next click turns off the light. The button is pronounced enough that it can be operated with gloves on.

There are a few factors that make this the best tool light I have right now and the reason it is being included in The EDC Tool Roll series. I have already mentioned that it is very light weight and very compact. That makes it easy to carry. The simple interface makes it easy to use and the USB rechargable feature makes it easy to keep up and running. It also happens to be EXTREMELY affordable – like buy two of them, impulse buy affordable –  at less than $16 each including shipping.

But, when it comes to use as a work light, the real story here is the beam… the glorious blast radius of lumens. The Bandit uses a COB LED which is basically a broad, flat, light emitting plate. There is no lens or reflector. You have no hotspot, just smooth even light for almost 180 degrees. This means I can see every little button, knob, and gauge in the open, unlit cabin of our tractors when I am blowing snow after dark (which really tests the water and cold resistance of a light). It means I can light up an entire room or everything at my feet while walking instead of just a narrow circle. It means I work up close on equipment with the light on high without having a blinding hotspot and without having to constantly adjust the angle of the light. Of course, that broad beam comes at the cost of throw, but you can’t have it all.

So far the Bandit seems to be quite tough and, based on past experience, I am confident that Streamlight will take care of me if something goes wrong. Given their customer service and the low cost of this light, I’m not afraid to use it like a tool. In fact, the low cost has me thinking of buying a second one so I always have one to use while the other is charging.

Where to Buy:

I bought mine on Amazon because they usually have a great price on the bright yellow version of the Bandit. I think I paid a little bit more than the sub $16 price they are charging as of the time of this writing: Streamlight Bandit on Amazon

Previously Reviewed Alternatives:

Nebo Tools Work Lights


See all the reviews for previous tools: The EDC Tool Roll

Do you have a pocketable work light that you prefer or another tool recommendation that fits The EDC Tool Roll? Tell us about it in the comments below or drop us a line on the Contact page.

The above URLs may be affiliate links.

Tease: New TLR Series Light from Streamlight

Streamlight will be showing a new light in their TLR weapon light series at SHOT Show 2018. While the only image we have is a teaser, the light appears to be Streamlight’s response to the trend toward compact handgun lights made specifically for the concealed carry market.

Interesting USB Charging Concept from Streamlight

Flashlights that can be recharged via USB ports are not new. However, Streamlight is taking the concept to new heights with an entire suite of lighting products that can be recharged via USB and a central product, the Super Siege Lantern, that can serve as the charger!

Streamlight’s Super Siege Lantern is great product on its own but by adding two headlamps and a handheld tactical light to their USB rechargeable lineup, the Super Siege is now the central element of an entire concept. The lantern features a large capacity rechargable battery with USB ports that can be used to recharge items like cell phones… and now flashlights. The applications for something like this are broad – hiking/camping, emergency lighting in the home, trade work like construction, and the list goes on.

Streamlight.com

Cloud Defensive Streamlight ProTac HL-X Package

If you need to add a light to your carbine or you just want to upgrade your existing light’s lumen output, pay attention. For a limited time, you can pick up one of Cloud Defensive’s LCSMK2K Light Control Systems bundled with a Streamlight ProTac Rail HL-X for $150. That is $150 for 1000 lumens and everything you need to organize all those annoying tape switch wires.

Cloud Defensive Streamlight ProTac HL-X Package

Streamlight Siege AA Red and Siege AA Blue

Streamlight’s Siege series of lanterns is very useful. The lanterns offer solid output, strong runtimes, and durable cases. They recently introduced two new versions that do more than just light a room… They support The National Fallen Firefighters Foundation and Concerns of Police Survivors, Inc.

The both of these lights run on 2 AA batteries and boast the following output and runtimes:

  • High for brightest light: 200 lumens; runs 7 hours
  • Medium for bright light and longer run times: 100 lumens; runs 15.5 hours
  • Low provides extended run times for when less light is needed: 50 lumens; runs 37 hours

The Siege AA Red and Siege AA Blue have a secondary red and blue (respectively) LEDs with the following outputs and runtimes:

  • Red/Blue LED High (night vision preserving mode): 0.7 lumens; runs 192 hours (8 days)
  • Flash SOS mode for emergency signaling: 0.7 lumens; runs 288 hours (12 days)

Streamlight will donate $2 from the sale of each of these lanterns to a charity – The National Fallen Firefighters Foundation for the Siege AA Red and Concerns of Police Survivors, Inc. for the Siege AA Blue.

Siege AA Red at Streamlight

Siege AA Blue at Streamlight

Streamlight ProTac Rail Mount 1 and 2 Mount Compatibility Check with IWC

Impact Weapons Components (IWC) produces a huge variety of mounts that are compatible with the Surefire Scout mounting interface. So, when it was announced that Streamlight would be producing lights that would share this mounting interface, IWC had a vested interest in ensuring the new ProTac Rail Mount lights are compatible with their entire line of mounts. They tested the lights themselves and then boxed up a ProTac Rail Mount 1 and 2 for me to test since I already own a wide variety of IWC light mounts.

protac rail mount 1 on functional AK setup

This article will not necessarily be a full review of the ProTac Rail Mount lights though there will be elements of a review. The main thrust here is how these lights work with IWC’s mounts. I tried these lights on several different light mounts and on several different firearms.

The following mounts were tested and found to perfectly:

  • SMC
  • SMCXL
  • THORNTAIL KeyMod
  • THORNTAIL
  • THORNTAIL SBR

I will share specific thoughts about each combination below.

SMC and SMCXL

Tested on the following:

  • AR-15 with MOE SL Hand Guards (MLOK)
  • AR-15 with MOE Hand Guards
  • AKM with MOE AK Hand Guards (MLOK)

In my opinion, this is the most exciting combination of mount and light that I tested. The SMC and SMCXL best represent the entire point of the ProTac Rail Mount lights – affordability. These are mounts that do not require a rail in order to achieve excellent light placement which makes the entire combination of hand guard, mount, and light very affordable.

This is a functional front end for any rifle. The SMC Light Mount makes the light easy to operate and leaves plenty of room for a sling mount, even on a short hand guard.

This is a functional front end for any rifle. The SMC Light Mount makes the light easy to operate and leaves plenty of room for a sling mount, even on a short hand guard.

The combination of the SMC light mount with Magpul’s MOE Hand Guards is pretty well vetted at this point. It works. The SMC and longer SMCXL move the light forward and offset it from the mounting point. This serves to clear gripping space on the hand guard and places it where it can be activated easily. It’s not just an affordable option. It’s a very good option that is hard to top with any other mount/handguard combination.

You can spend more on a hand guard, mount, and light combination but you will not necessarily get a more functional setup than what this represents. Additionally, this entire setup (for AR-15s) can be executed in such a way that there is no permanent change to the host rifle which may be attractive or necessary for some users.

THORNTAIL KeyMod

Tested on the following:

  • AR-15 with Fortis REV 12 Rail
  • AR-15 with Parallax Tactical FFSSR KeyMod Rail

The THORNTAIL KeyMod is a unique mount in the IWC line. It mounts to KeyMod and accepts standard tactical lights via a flashlight ring, Scout pattern lights, and rail mounted lights. Like the everything else in the THORNTAIL line, it places the light in an offset position.

IMG_0836

Interestingly, the Protac Rail Mount 1, is functionally and dimensionally similar to another light that IWC played a role in developing, Elzetta’s Mini CQB. I compared the two lights directly and while the Mini CQB is certainly the better made light, they are both functional options. The Mini CQB offers bomb-proof quality with a more flexible integrated mount. The ProTac Rail Mount 1 offers acceptable quality, a lower price, and AA battery compatibility.

If you need to place the ProTac Rail Mount light even closer to the rail than the THORNTAIL KeyMod allows, you can check out any of IWC’s inline mounting options. These mounts will mount on a similar footprint but hold the light closer to the mounting surface.

THORNTAIL and THORNTAIL SBR

Tested on the following:

  • AKM with Ultimak Railed Gas Tube
  • AR-15s with various rails

This is likely the most flexible mounting setup that I tested simply because of the proliferation of mounting rails. This brings the forward and offset light position of the THORNTAIL line of mounts to any firearm with a standard Picatinny rail. I tested it on the usual suspects but it could also be used on anything from a Ruger 10/22 with the right rail to a Marlin 336 with a XS Sight Systems Scout Rail.

IMG_0837

Wrap Up

I am impressed with these lights and the various mounts that IWC offers (which is why I own so darn many of them). The ProTac line of hand held lights has been used in weapon mounting and CCW applications for years before the release of the Rail Mount lights and seem to be trustworthy at a very attractive price. I think the various combinations represented here offer some very good budget options for shooters who aren’t ready or able to drop the coin on a premium light like a Surefire Scout or Elzetta CQB Mini.

If you are concerned that these may be “knock offs” of the Surefire Scout lights, please read my previous post on this topic.

To see more thoughts on the unique functionality of the Rail Mount 1, please read here (especially if you like the idea of a AA compatible weapon light).

Thank you to Impact Weapons Components for providing these lights for mount compatibility testing. The lights are available from Impact Weapons Components. All of their compatible light mounts may be viewed on their light mount page. You can use the discount code “triggerjerk” to save 5% on your purchase of IWC branded items.

IMG_0838

The ProTac Rail Mount 2 is shorter overall than a Surefire M600 Scout but heavier and wider.

Streamlight ProTac 1L-1AA

I recently shared with you how impressed I am with Streamlight’s ProTac Rail Mount 1 and its ability to be powered from a CR123A or AA battery. Streamlight has just announced that they will be bringing that same technology to their ProTac handheld lights in the new ProTac 1L-1AA.

protac1l-1aa_logoed

The new light will feature anodized aluminum construction, a “unbreakable” two-way clip, anti-roll bezel, and Streamlights TEN-TAP programming to allow the user to choose between 3 different output sets including high/strobe/low, high only, and high/low. The light is also IPX7 waterproof (1 meter for 30 minutes).

The output is basically identical to the ProTac Rail Mount 1.

 

  • CR123A lithium battery output:
    • High for bright light: 350 lumens; 6,400 candela; 160m beam; runs 1.5 hours
    • Low for longer run time: 40 lumens; 720 candela; 53m beam; runs 14.hours
    • Strobe for signaling or disorienting: runs 3 hours
  • AA alkaline/lithium battery output:
    • High: 150 lumens; 2,750 candela; 105m beam; runs 1 hour 20 minutes (alkaline);  runs 4.25 hours (lithium)
    • Low: 40 lumens; 720 candela; 53m beam; runs 7.5 hours (alkaline);  runs 14 hours (lithium)
    • Strobe for signaling or disorienting: runs 3.5 hours (alkaline); runs 8 hours (lithium)

The new light will be on display at NRA 2016 so swing by booth #5391 to see it in person. You can also learn more by visiting Streamlight’s website.

 

Initial Impressions: Streamlight ProTac Rail Mount 1

I have been working with both the new ProTac Rail Mount lights from Streamlight for a couple of weeks now. I have spent more time with the Rail Mount 1 in particular. This post should not be considered a full review given the short time they have been in my hands. Consider it something like my initial impressions and perhaps an answer to some common inquiries that I receive here often at JTT – AA battery powered weapon light availability and a more general question about affordable lighting set ups .

These lights were sent to me by Impact Weapons Components (IWC) for the express purpose of testing them with a variety of IWC mounts of which I own several. That article will come later and will have plenty of pictures of the lights on various IWC mounts and impressions of the combinations.

Initially, I have had the Protac Rail Mount 1 mounted in an IWC SMC Light Mount on an Arsenal SGL-21 with Magpul MOE AK Hand Guards and also on an AR-15 with Magpul MOE SL Hand Guards. This setup has proven to be very useful in both cases.

protac rail mount 1 on IWC SMC

AA Battery Compatibility

I commonly receive questions regarding the availability of AA weapon lights. While alkaline AA batteries are generally less suitable for weapon lights than lithium CR123A batteries, I do understand that gun guys also tend to have a prepper streak. The perceived long term availability of AA batteries makes a weapon light powered by them attractive. I am happy to report that the ProTac Rail Mount 1 can be powered by a single AA battery without modification (the documentation specifically mentions alkaline and lithium chemistries).

The output is reduced to 150 lumens on high for the lower voltage AA batteries but, according to Streamlight, the light will provide regulated output for 1.5 hours on an alkaline AA and an impressive 4.5 hours on a lithium AA. Compare those numbers to 350 lumens for 1.75 hours with a CR123A. That 150 lumen performance for 4.5 hours with a lithium AA may actually be very appealing to those who prefer a light in the 120-150 lumen range (though lumens don’t tell the whole story of what makes a light bright enough or too bright).

Remember that it wasn’t that long ago that 120 lumen LED weapon lights were the bleeding edge. 150 lumens from a single AA battery is impressive especially considering this is one of the very few dedicated weapon lights that can be powered from a AA battery.

Affordable Options

Questions about affordable versions of this or affordable versions of that are some of the most common questions received here at JTT with weapon lights being a frequent topic. I like to point out that you must also consider the price of not only the light but the mount and hand guard in that discussion. Additionally, your weapon light must be useful regardless of how affordable it is or isn’t. If you find a cheap hand guard but it requires a jerry-rigged mounting solution to work with a light, that isn’t a good value. If you have a high end hand guard but you are limited by your light’s integral mount (or lack their of), the usefulness of the total package can suffer.

This is where I believe these lights can really stand out due to their use of the Scout Light mounting system. The lights themselves are affordable and are compatible with a variety of affordable, high-quality mounts that can be mounted to affordable, high quality hand guards.

You could add Magpul MOE Hand Guards to you rifle (AR or AK), use an SMC Light Mount, and a ProTac Rail Mount light. Add a vertical grip or IWC hand stop if you are so inclined. All of these items are quite affordable but this isn’t just an affordable light mounting option. It’s a very good option. The light falls right where it should for easy operation. It is relatively lightweight. The hand guard is cleared for establishing a good grip. This is just a solid front end set up for your AK or AR that is all made possible by the compatibly of the ProTac Rail Mounts with existing light mounts.

This is a functional front end for any rifle. The SMC Light Mount makes the light easy to operate and leaves plenty of room for a sling mount, even on a short hand guard.

This is a functional front end for any AK or AR. The SMC Light Mount makes the light easy to operate and leaves plenty of room for a sling mount, even on a short hand guard.

Other Impressions

In general, I have been impressed with these lights over my short time with them. There is certainly no replacement for time and repetitions over a large sample size when it comes to establishing the reliability of something like a flashlight so these impressions are very preliminary. On the other hand, the Streamlight ProTac handheld lights are fairly well vetted at this point.

The Rail Mount Lights use a large collimating lens in order to shape the lumens that are pushed out the front. The lens itself is quite large compared the reflectors found on the ProTac handheld lights (about the size of the lens found in the Streamlight TRL-1 HL). The beam shape is very good with a nice hotspot for good throw and a wide corona for taking in a wide view of your surroundings.

I am impressed with the value that these represent much like the Streamlight TLR-1. These lights come with an integral mount, a tape switch, a tail cap, and various other items for mounting and routing the tape switch. The Rail Mount 1 comes with both a CR123A and AA battery. The quality is on par with what I have come to expect from the ProTac line (I own several of the hand held lights). Part of the value is also Streamlight’s customer service which in my experience has always been excellent with quick responses and satisfying outcomes.

I will continue testing and trying different mounts. In the mean time, you can check out the ProTac Rail Mount lights and various IWC light mounts at Impact Weapons Components. They will be offering combo deals on these lights with their mounts soon so stay tuned. Remember to use code TRIGGERJERK at checkout to save 5%.

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