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Knipex EDC Series: 6″ High Leverage Needle Nose Combination Pliers (08 22 145)

Knipex has a new tool in their “EDC Series” – 6″ High Leverage Needle Nose Combination Pliers. The new compact pliers feature a versatile jaw shape with a number of functions and compact size that will keep them pocketable. The jaws have finer teeth near the tips and more coarse teeth nearer the hinge point. I expect that, with the way Knipex hardens their tools, these teeth will provide excellent grip and the included wire cutters will punch above their weight class.

They are already available at online retailers including Amazon: Knipex 08 22 145.

A slimmer variant is also available: Knipex 08 21 145

While the tool itself is noteworthy, it is perhaps more noteworthy that Knipex is now embracing the EDC market. Knipex products are becoming increasingly common every day carry items among aficionados (read: EDC Nerds) and they have developed a large presence on social media because of that fact. Readers of our EDC tool series, The EDC Tool Roll, will be familiar with several EDC-worthy tools from the German tool maker. Previously these tools weren’t necessarily marketed as an “EDC Series” but the EDC market has likely boosted their sales. This latest release could signal Knipex’s foray into tools made specifically for this market and that could mean there are more tools coming that will be at home in any EDC kit or range bag.

You can view all of the available variants of these pliers at Knipex-Tools.com

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The EDC Tool Roll: Pliers Comparison – Knipex Cobra, Channellock 424, and Tekton 37521

The EDC Tool Roll is a feature on Jerking the Trigger in which we profile various every day carry worthy tools. The tools shown aren’t multi-tools but rather real tools, that by virtue of their compact size, light weight, usefulness, or unique functionality, can find a place in any range kit, emergency kit, or every day carry bag.

Feel free to comment on the tools that you carry so we can all learn! The discussion on these posts has been very valuable so far.


You ask, JTT delivers. This post will serve as a comparison between the 3 pliers that we have profiled so far in The EDC Tool Roll series. You can check out their earlier reviews below for more background:

Knipex Cobra 125

Channellock 424 and Tekton 37521

This isn’t really going to be a fair comparison because the Knipex Cobras smoke the other pliers in this list on everything except price but that doesn’t mean the others are useless or junk. In fact, the Tekton 37521 might be one of the best values we have profiled so far.

Quality – The Knipex Cobras are plainly the highest quality pliers in the bunch. They are beautifully drop forged, perfectly ground, and have knife-hard jaws that grip tenaciously. Then I think the Tekton Pliers, which are made in the USA, win out over the Channellocks on the strength of the Tekton’s adjustable pivot which make them feel tighter.

Features – The Knipex Cobras are feature rich, while the others are straight forward and functional. The Knipex pliers have very hard jaws with teeth that are set opposed to the direction that you turn the pliers which allows them to actually lock into whatever you are trying to turn. They also have a massive adjustment range and large jaws which is key for EDC pliers – something that needs to be small enough to carry but versatile enough (and large enough) to use on a variety of fasteners.

The Tektons are only slightly larger than the Channellock 424s but that little but of extra bulk gives you larger jaws, more comfortable grips, and a more functional adjustable pivot. The Tektons take second place on features.

Size – The Channellock 424s are the smallest and lightest pliers in this comparison. The Tektons and Knipex Cobras are similar in size with the Tekton pliers being ever so slightly larger in most dimensions. As mentioned above, the Knipex Cobras have the largest jaws by a long shot. All three of them are easily pocketable.

Price – This is where the Tekton and Channellock come out ahead of the Knipex Cobras. The Channellock 424 cost around $12-14, the Tekton 37521 are usually $10-12, and the Knipex Cobras come in at a hefty $28-38 (I’ve seen them lower but you’ll have to really shop around). I’ve purchased all three and I believe the Knipex Cobras justify their price. There is just nothing else like them and I am willing to pay for that. However, if you can’t stomach the Knipex price, the Tektons are a smoking deal.

How to Choose – If you absolutely need the smallest and lightest pliers for your kit, get the Channellock 424. If you want EDC pliers that can do anything small pliers can do but can be pressed into the work of larger pliers, choose the Knipex. If you want the best value on a capable pair of pliers for your EDC tool kit, the Tektons wins.

Where to Buy – Channellock are almost certainly available at a hardware store near you. Tektons are sold almost exclusively online. Knipex can sometimes be found at Sears Hardware or other stores but online is likely your best bet. All three are available from Amazon:

Knipex Cobra 87 01 125

Channellock 424 on Amazon

Tekton 37521 on Amazon


There are a number of 4.5-5″ adjustable pliers on the market from Irwin and others. Do you have compact adjustable pliers that you prefer? Tell us about it below.

The EDC Tool Roll: Knipex CoBolt Cutters

The EDC Tool Roll is a feature on Jerking the Trigger in which we profile various every day carry worthy tools. The tools shown aren’t multi-tools but rather real tools, that by virtue of their compact size, light weight, usefulness, or unique functionality, can find a place in any range kit, emergency kit, or every day carry bag.

Feel free to comment on the tools that you carry so we can all learn! The discussion on these posts has been very valuable so far.


Today’s tool in The EDC Tool Roll series will be a little bit of a departure in that it will not fit completely in most pockets though it is still very easy to carry compared to similar tools. The Knipex CoBolt Cutter series of tools are the kind of tools that appeal to anyone concerned about being prepared for emergencies and they are exceedingly easy to carry compared to even the smallest traditional bolt cutters.

The Knipex CoBolt Cutters feature a compound leverage hinge and are most commonly available with an 8″ overall length (though there is a 10″ version that is harder to find and more expensive). They are basically a pair of compound leverage bolt cutters that are no larger than most pairs of diagnal pliers/wire cutters.

Unlike many larger bolt cutters, most of which are very poorly made, the CoBolt Cutters feature cutting edges that are hardened to 64 HRC. That is as hard as a high end knife. The cutting edge is so hard and the compound leverage is so effective that you will be surprised with what you can cut. I’ve cut small to medium padlocks (especially cheaper locks that aren’t hardened), all kinds of  fencing and heavy wire, large nails and screws, chain, even a sling stud that was too long during a recent installation on a Ruger 10/22 stock. The applications for carrying one of set of these in an urban BOB are nearly endless. You can cut your way into and out of trouble with relative ease.

The CoBolt Cutters are available in a number of different versions but the basic version is my favorite. The Knipex 71 01 200 is the most common model and likely the most versatile. I also have a version that is identical except the jaws are notched to allow them to cut larger diameter stock at the highest leverage point (Model 71 31 200). CoBolt Cutters are also available with angled heads, molded grips, and countless other versions but, again, the basic model is the most versatile (and most affordable).

Where to Buy: Knipex CoBolt Cutters are commonly used in trades so they turn up regularly on Ebay in decent used condition. I’ve purchased both of mine this way and paid less than $15 each. As long as the cutting edges are in good shape and they aren’t pitted, they clean up easily with some oil and a Scotch-Brite pad.

If you can’t find a used pair or you prefer to buy at a brick and mortar, Sears Hardware usually has the basic model at a decent price. Otherwise, Amazon is a great place to buy: Knipex 71 01 20 CoBolt

You can explore all the available CoBolt cutters here.

Alternatatives: I don’t really know of a true alternative for the CoBolt Cutters. I guess a pair of folding compact bolt cutters would be the closest but even those will be considerably larger and likely more expensive for a decent example.


If you have a tool you can recommend, tell us about it below. The comments have been a valuable source of information in this series.

The EDC Tool Roll: Triple Seven Gear Micro Kit

The EDC Tool Roll is a feature on Jerking the Trigger in which we profile various every day carry worthy tools. The tools shown aren’t multi-tools but rather real tools, that by virtue of their compact size, light weight, usefulness, or unique functionality, can find a place in any range kit, emergency kit, or every day carry bag.

Feel free to comment on the tools that you carry so we can all learn! The discussion on these posts has been very valuable so far.


We’ve spent time talking about some tools. It’s about time we started talking about the tool roll.

Contents listed at end of post…

I use a Micro Kit from Triple Seven Gear as my EDC Tool Roll. I’ve used Triple Seven Gear products going all the way back to their original Mini Kit Mk-7 and own at least one of everything they make (and several of a few products).

The Micro Kit is ideal for me because the size is just right – small enough to carry but big enough to fit what I need. It is compact enough to fit in a coat pocket, back pocket of jeans, or even some front pockets. It does not require a large cargo pocket to be carried. In spite of that compact size, the Micro Kit can pack and organize a lot of tools.

It folds to about 4″ x 6″ when closed and can be secured with a simple elastic loop. I like that there are no zippers or hook and loop to limit how I stuff the pouch. When open, it lays completely flat and gives good visibility to the tools contained inside. I can even turn it “inside-out” so that it fits in my pocket but still offers access to the tools.

The elastic loops can fit a variety of tools and anything that does fit well in the loops can be stashed in one of the pockets. The clear vinyl window is particularly useful for stashing small items that you want to be able to see.

You can check out the Micro Kit (or Mini Kit Mk-7 if you need a larger version) at Triple Seven Gear.

Do you have an EDC-capable tool organizer that you prefer or have you made your own? Tell us about it below.


Contents in the image above:

The EDC Tool Roll: Knipex Pliers Wrench (86 03 125)

The EDC Tool Roll is a feature on Jerking the Trigger in which we profile various every day carry worthy tools. The tools shown aren’t multi-tools but rather real tools, that by virtue of their compact size, light weight, usefulness, or unique functionality, can find a place in any range kit, emergency kit, or every day carry bag.

Feel free to comment on the tools that you carry so we can all learn! The discussion on these posts has been very valuable so far.


Knipex Pliers Wrenches might be my favorite tool in my tool chest and my EDC Tool Roll. I say this not only because of how well they work but because of how clever they are. What I mean is, I really like how they work but I love the idea of them too!

Knipex Pliers Wrench (right) shown with Cobra Pliers (left).

If you can imagine adjustable pliers that have been retooled with some engineering magic to have parallel opening jaws, you have the idea of the Pliers Wrench. They open and close like pliers but have the flat, parallel opening jaws of a wrench. The result is a tool that can “ratchet” by simply loosening your grip, has very fine adjustability, lets you easily control the pressure on the fastener with your grip, and can handle much larger fasteners than similarly sized adjustable wrenches.

These parallel jaws allow other uses like straightening sheet metal. They can also be used to push in roll pins and work especially well on stubborn pins like the bolt catch roll pin on an AR-15 lower receiver. You just place the Pliers Wrench over the pin and squeeze your grip to push it into place.

I own 3 different sizes of the Pliers Wrench but the one I carry daily is the 5″ version (86 03 125). It is the same size as the Knipex Cobra Pliers that I also carry and between the two of them, I can get a lot done. This tool is surprisingly small but it can be adjusted wide enough to turn 7/8″ diameter fasteners.

One thing that makes the 5″ version especially well suited to everyday carry or range bag use is how thin the jaws are. The tool itself is extremely stout but the jaws taper to just less than 1/8″ thick at the tips. This makes it easy to get on the smaller nuts and bolts often found on optics mounts or other gear.

I purchased my 5″ Knipex Pliers Wrench (86 03 125) at Amazon. I have found the larger sizes locally at places like Sears Hardware but never the 5″ version so I had to purchase online.

For a lower priced alternative adjustable wrench that is compact but still handles larger fasteners, check out the Lobster Shorty. We will eventually post some comparisons of a few options in a later installment of The EDC Tool Roll.

Do you have a compact adjustable wrench that you prefer? Tell us about it below.

The EDC Tool Roll: Knipex Cobra Pliers 87 01 125

The EDC Tool Roll is a new feature on Jerking the Trigger in which we profile various every day carry worthy tools. The tools shown won’t be multi-tools but rather real tools, that by virtue of their compact size, light weight, usefulness, or unique functionality, can find a place in any range kit, emergency kit, or every day carry bag.

Feel free to comment on the tools that you carry so we can all learn!


German tool manufacturer, Knipex, makes a number of my favorite tools but their 5″ Cobra Pliers (87 01 125) are at the top of that list. These extremely compact pliers are extremely big on usefulness.

I bought the Cobra Pliers because I was tired of the pliers on my multi-tools never quite being the right tool for the job. The 5″ (125mm) Cobra Pliers are only slightly longer than most multi-tools in the folded position but they boast all the same features as Knipex’s larger pliers including drop-forged steel construction, push-button adjustment, and hardened jaws that self-lock into nearly anything you are trying to turn.

They are just under 5″ in length and just under 3 ounces in weight. This makes them easy to carry in pocket, small bag, compact tool roll, or in the built in admin organizer of your pack.

In spite of that small size, they can be used to turn nuts (or round material) up to 1″ in diameter. They grip material so tenaciously that I have used them to turn nuts that were nearly completly rounded. The forward portion of the jaws lets me do fine work like gripping webbing to pull through a tight tri-glide, while the inner portions of the jaws are recessed to mate with nuts, bolt heads or round stock like pipes and caps.

These have a place in The EDC Tool Roll because they are the pliers that I wish came in my multi-tool.

I have purchased these locally from Sears Hardware stores or online from Amazon. See the Knipex Cobra Pliers at Amazon.

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