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Archive | The EDC Tool Roll

The EDC Tool Roll: Victorinox SwissCard Scissors

The EDC Tool Roll is a feature on Jerking the Trigger in which we profile various every day carry worthy tools. The tools shown aren’t multi-tools but rather real tools, that by virtue of their compact size, light weight, usefulness, or unique functionality, can find a place in any range kit, emergency kit, or every day carry bag.

Feel free to comment on the tools that you carry so we can all learn! The discussion on these posts has been very valuable so far.


I started writing The EDC Tool Roll series last winter at the suggestion of my wife. At the time, I was trying to put together a small, pocketable tool kit that would prevent me from having to trudge all the way back to the shop for a common tool when I was out working on our property. I never anticipated it would take off the way it did, especially when it comes to reader interaction! It has been great hearing from so many of you with tool recommendations or pictures of your EDC Tool Rolls!

Trent R. reached out to me to recommend a pair of scissors. I happened to already have the scissors he recommended and I am not sure why it never dawned on me to include them in The EDC Tool Roll because I use them all the time. However, the specific scissors Trent recommended will be profiled in another edition. Today, I want to take a look at what might be the smallest and lightest scissors around that are actually worth using – the tiny, ultra-light SwissCard Scissors from Victorinox.

Like the Victorinox Swisstool Plus Replacement Wrench that we recently reviewed (click HERE to read the review), the SwissCard Scissors were never meant to be sold as a stand-alone tool even though they work very well in that roll. These scissor slide into and out of Victorinox’s SwissCard multi-tools and, unlike most of their scissors, are not permanently connected to the host tool.

The SwissCard Scissors are spring loaded so that they “spring” open. This makes them surprisingly easy to use in spite of their small size (3″ overall, 1/10″ thick, 7 grams). However, this means that open is the default position unless the scissors are actively compressed. These are wickedly sharp so that is a problem but one that is easy to fix. In a SwissCard, there is a specialized compartment for holding the scissors in the close position but since I don’t use the SwissCard, I just slip the scissors into a small section of drinking straw (see image above). The straw adds basically no bulk or weight and keeps the overall package so small that I can store them anywhere.

Scissors are just better than a knife for some tasks. These scissors are great in your EDC kit but can also find a home in your hiking gear or first aid kit. I have used them for cutting up patches for a Therm-a-Rest mattress or moleskin to deal with blisters. They can strip wire, cut tape, trim frays on gear, trim your nails in a pinch, and more. If you have them in your kit, you’ll use them.

I will profile a few other scissors that I use regularly but this are by far the smallest and lightest. If you want scissors that will fit any EDC Tool Roll, these are what you want. There is room enough in even the most compact kit.

Where to Buy:

I pulled my SwissCard Scissors out of broken SwissCard that was going to be discarded. You are not likely to find these at any brick and mortar store since very few of them carry Victorinox replacement parts. There are various online retailers and auction sites that offer them so shop around.

Amazon is probably the easiest place to pick them up: Victorinox SwissCard Scissors on Amazon (affiliate link)

Alternatives:

I haven’t reviewed any of these yet, but I own the following alternatives. They will find their way onto these pages eventually. Both are made in the USA!

Slip-N-Snip Original Folding Scissors (SLS1)

Klein Tools Electrician’s Scissors


See all the reviews for previous tools: The EDC Tool Roll

Do you have scissors that you prefer or another tool recommendation that fits The EDC Tool Roll? Tell us about it in the comments below or drop us a line on the Contact page.

The EDC Tool Roll: Victorinox Swisstool Plus Replacement Wrench

The EDC Tool Roll is a feature on Jerking the Trigger in which we profile various every day carry worthy tools. The tools shown aren’t multi-tools but rather real tools, that by virtue of their compact size, light weight, usefulness, or unique functionality, can find a place in any range kit, emergency kit, or every day carry bag.

Feel free to comment on the tools that you carry so we can all learn! The discussion on these posts has been very valuable so far.


The Victorinox Swisstool Plus Replacement Wrench (VSPRW) is sold as a “replacement” part for the Swisstool Multi-tool but it works just fine as a standalone tool. It is a “L” wrench style driver that accepts standard 1/4″ shank bits at both ends. It is functionally similar to the previously reviewed Engineer DR-07 and Tekton 14-in-1 Offset Driver. However, there are two key differences in the VSPRW’s lack of included bits and lack of overmolded handle.

Neither of those differences are really short comings. You likely already have bits and the lack of overmolded handle means the VPSPRW is trimmer and lighter than almost all the other drivers reviewed so far. It still offers good reach and great torque. Yes, this tool is simple compared to some but it is also extremely well made (of course, it’s Victorinox) from solid metal, offers captive bit sockets, and costs less than pretty much any other driver we have profiled in the series.

It will hold any 1/4″ shape bit including those without the retention notches though bit with the notches will be slightly more secure. Retention is very good with just a bit of wobble. No amount of shaking or jarring will cause the bits to drop out on their own. The bits are easy to change with no active locking mechanism.

If space is at a premium in your EDC Tool Roll, I think it will be hard to beat the Victorinox Swisstool Plus Replacement Wrench.

Where to Buy: You are not likely to find these at any brick and mortar store since very few of them carry Victorinox replacement parts. There are various online retailers that offer them. I just added mine to an Amazon order: Victorinox Swisstool Plus Replacement Wrench on Amazon (affiliate link)

This wrench is also available with bits, a bit holder, and a sheath (the sheath is larger than necessary for the wrench to accomodate a Swisstool Multi-Tool). I find the wrench to be a better value on its own: Wrench with Bits, Holder, and Sheath on Amazon

Alternatives from Previous Reviews:

Wera Kraftform Kompakt 10

Engineer DR-07 Twin Wrench Driver

Tekton 14-in-1 Offset Screwdriver (2945)

Replaceable Edition Fix It Sticks

Doc Allen’s VersaTool

Wera Kraftform Kompact 25


See all the reviews for previous tools: The EDC Tool Roll

Do you have a compact driver that you prefer or another tool recommendation that fits The EDC Tool Roll? Tell us about it in the comments below.

Wise Men Company Pill Bug Tool Roll

The Wise Men Company’s Pill Bug Tool Roll is an EDC-sized tool roll with tactical sensibilities. It is constructed from 500D nylon and features 9 pockets of various sizes. The Pill Bug can be opened and lays flat to present all your tools like any other tool roll. It also folds in half and can then be rolled into a tight bundle which is secured with shock cord.

If you have followed The EDC Tool Roll series on JTT, you haven’t seen many true tool rolls because most are larger than is necessary for the types of tools profiled. The Pill Bug however, is sized specifically for EDC so it might be a solid option for those looking to carry tools from that series.

Check out the Pill Bug Tool Roll at WiseMenCompany.com

Bug Out Bag Companion: Knipex to Release 6″ CoBolt Cutters

The Knipex CoBolt Cutters article in our series, The EDC Tool Roll, continues to be one of the most viewed articles in that group. Read it here: The EDC Tool Roll: Knipex CoBolt Cutters

I guess the idea of a tool that is essentially a hand held set of compound bolt cutters is attractive to a lot of prepared citizens. Previously, the CoBolt Cutters were only available in 8″ and 10″ lengths but that is about to change. Knipex has announced that they will release a 6 1/4″ Mini CoBolt.

The Mini CoBolt Cutters will likely give up some leverage to the larger 8″ and 10″ models. It will take some testing to see if these can serve as a more compact option that are still suitable for bug out bag tasks.

Fix It Sticks Replaceable Version – Shooting & Hunting Edition w/ Bracket

If you follow our regular feature, The EDC Tool Roll, you’ve seen the Fix It Stick Replaceable Version before. It is one of my all time favorite EDC-worthy tools and a mainstay in my range bag. I didn’t think I needed another one until I saw the new version that comes with a slick holder.

The original Fix It Sticks Replaceable comes in a very nice nylon pouch but this new version comes with a newly designed bracket that holds the tool and up to 18 bits (14 on the bracket, 4 on the tool sections) in a compact package. It would be perfect for dropping in your EDC or range bag.

Fix It Sticks are already a great, American made tool. This new bracket makes them even more attractive.

Fix It Sticks Replaceable Version – Shooting & Hunting Edition w/ Bracket

The EDC Tool Roll: Wera Kraftform Kompakt 10 Driver

The EDC Tool Roll is a feature on Jerking the Trigger in which we profile various every day carry worthy tools. The tools shown aren’t multi-tools but rather real tools, that by virtue of their compact size, light weight, usefulness, or unique functionality, can find a place in any range kit, emergency kit, or every day carry bag.

Feel free to comment on the tools that you carry so we can all learn! The discussion on these posts has been very valuable so far.


The quest for the perfect pocket tool kit continues! The vast majority of tool recommendations that I have received have been for drivers and a handful of readers recommended the Wera Kraftform Kompakt (KK) 10 especially after I reviewed the Kraftform Kompakt 25. The KK 25 is basically a full size screwdriver that collapses down to a more pocketable size. The KK 10, the subject of this installment of The EDC Tool Roll, is a true pocket screw driver. It starts small and stays small.

The Wera KK10 is barely larger than a tube of chapstick so it fits in even the smallest tool kits. However, unlike many small drivers, you can actually get some work done with it. The handle is wide enough that you can apply decent torque and it is comfortable to hold thanks to Wera’s ergonomic design.

The KK 10 uses the same Wera designed Rapidaptor bit holder found on the KK25. It is the best I have used. It holds the bit positively, releases them easily by lifting the collar, and the collar rotates freely so you can sort of pinch it there to hold the bit in the fastener as you turn.

Wera’s bits are of excellent quality. The KK 10 will accept any standard 1/4″ shank bits so you can customize your kit based on the fasteners you encounter (especially handy for your range bag). Wera provides an assortment of 9 bits with the tool: 2 TZ Slotted bits – 1/8”, 7/32”; 2 TZ Phillips bits – PH1, PH2; 2 TZ Pozidriv bits – PZ1, PZ2; 3 TZ TORX bits – TX10, TX15, TX20. The included T15 Torx bit is especially nice since that size is common for scope mounts.

The KK 10 comes with a slick plastic holder that I promptly put away in a box somewhere. It is just larger than I really need in my kit. I can easily store the handle and bits (in a small bit holder) separately so they take up less space. However, the case really is quite nice and may be useful to some.

Where to Buy: I can’t find these in any brick and mortar store in my area but there are a handful of sources online. It is worth shopping around for the best price. Ebay sellers often have good prices on these but, Amazon had the best deal when I bought mine: Wera Kraftform Kompakt 10 on Amazon

I should also note that Amazon prices change all the time. It is actually a little cheaper now than when I bought mine.

Alternatives: As much as I like the KK 10, I think I still prefer the Engineer DR-07 Twin Wrench Driver and it’s price seems to be dropping like a rock on Amazon. It’s “L” wrench shape makes it easier to apply torque but the bit holder on the Wera Tools is almost too hard to resist. Both options are very well made and work great in a compact tool kit.

Engineer DR-07 Twin Wrench Driver

Tekton 14-in-1 Offset Screwdriver (2945) (This is nearly identical to the DR-07 but with lower, though still acceptable, quality)

Replaceable Edition Fix It Sticks

Doc Allen’s VersaTool

Wera Kraftform Kompact 25


Do you have a compact driver that you prefer or another tool recommendation that fits The EDC Tool Roll? Tell us about it in the comments below.

The EDC Tool Roll: Mountain Ridge Gear XS Duffel Bag

The EDC Tool Roll is a feature on Jerking the Trigger in which we profile various every day carry worthy tools. The tools shown aren’t multi-tools but rather real tools, that by virtue of their compact size, light weight, usefulness, or unique functionality, can find a place in any range kit, emergency kit, or every day carry bag.

Feel free to comment on the tools that you carry so we can all learn! The discussion on these posts has been very valuable so far.


I started writing this series because I built my own pocket tool kit to make my life easier around our property. My wife suggested that I write about the kit and I am glad she did because it has grown into one of the most popular features on JTT. So much so, that I have received a ton of great suggestions from readers including a few that have asked for suggestions for a tool bag that is still compact but that can carry more tools than the pocket sized options that we have already covered.

Coming up with a recommendation was easy because I already have the perfect bag. Mountain Ridge Gear (MRG) makes 4 different sized Duffel Bags that range from very large to very small. The smallest, a size MRG calls XS, is a perfect size for a compact tool kit at 9″ x 4″ x 4″. I know it can be hard to visualize dimension so think of a typical toiletry bag and you’ll understand the size of the MRG XS Duffel. I can fit every tool that we have profiled so far in The EDC Tool Roll series inside of it.

The XS size is perfect for stuffing inside of a larger bag like an EDC backpack or range bag. It has a tubular webbing handle built into one end that makes it easy to retrieve from inside of another bag.

These bags are BOMB-PROOF and super affordable. MRG sews them right here in the USA, Colorado to be specific. They use 1000D Cordura Nylon and beefy #10 YKK zippers. Every single edge is bound with tape so every seam is reinforced and there are no bare edges to start fraying.

MRG makes these bags to last in a way that few nylon companies still do and the bag still only costs $15 shipped! I am not sure you can get a cheap, off-shore produced tool bag for less than that. These bags are a bargain.

When I purchased this one, I should have bought a whole stack of them because there is no shortage of ways to use a bag like this. They are a great size for travel, vehicle first aid kits, tool bags, chainsaw tools, and all kinds of other uses.

Where to Buy: The XS Duffel is only available from Mountain Ridge Gear. It’s $18 including shipping!

Alternatives: I am sure there are other small bags out there that would work but it will be tough to beat the price and quality of the MRG XS Duffel. We have covered two smaller “tool bags” in this series already.

Maxpedition Micro Pocket Organizer

Triple Seven Gear Micro Kit


Do you have a compact tool bag, tool roll, or other tool that want to recommend? Tell us about it below.

The EDC Tool Roll: Nebo Tools Work Lights

The EDC Tool Roll is a feature on Jerking the Trigger in which we profile various every day carry worthy tools. The tools shown aren’t multi-tools but rather real tools, that by virtue of their compact size, light weight, usefulness, or unique functionality, can find a place in any range kit, emergency kit, or every day carry bag.

Feel free to comment on the tools that you carry so we can all learn! The discussion on these posts has been very valuable so far.


The EDC Tool Roll series has generated more reader email than just about anything that has ever been on the pages of JTT. You’ve really come through for me with recommendations. Several emails have asked when I was going to include a flashlight in this series and I typically responded that I was hesitant to do so because I think most of us are already carrying a flashlight. Reader James R. changed my mind when he showed me the Nebo Tools series of pocketable work lights. I wish I would have known about these years ago.

To call these lights “flashlights” does them a disservice. They really have more in common with your typical work light that you would find on a small stand or tripod… except these fit in you pocket or small tool kit. Like a work light, they are designed to be used hands free. You can obviously hold them in your hand but they really work best out of your hands.

They have a rotating pocket clip that allows you to clip the light to your clothing (shirt pocket, collar, etc.) for hands free use and then aim it where you need it. The clip is also magnetic so it can cling to ferrous surfaces like your vehicle, your tool chest, or even the 74″ PTO snow blower that are getting ready for winter (ask me how I know). They can be stood on end on a level surface.

Here is a trick I figured out that is probably the most versatile way these can be used. I’ve found that I can stick them to a steel tool as ballast so that I can place it on any surface without worrying about it tipping over. I can direct it anywhere I need it in this configuration. It works really well when stuck to a handgun magazine on the range if you need to light up an admin area during low light training and it takes up about the same amount of room as a marker in your range bag.

A long, wide LED emits 170 lumens of light. This ribbon like emitter is used, rather than a smaller point of light in the center of an optic or reflector, to create a wall of light with no discernible hotspot. It lights up a room evenly from a distance or can be used to light up your work piece up close without washing out thanks to the lack of hotspot. I get about 3(ish) hours of continuous runtime before I swap batteries.

There are a number of similar lights on the market and, honestly, it can be hard to tell which ones are decent so I was happy to have a direct recommendation of the Nebo Tools line. They are dirt cheap ($7-8 a piece for the model shown) and seem to be of decent quality. They also have a solid review history.

The lights shown in this review are the Larry C model. They take 3 AAA batteries and are fairly compact but they are long(ish) since the batteries are installed end to end. They just barely fit in my tool kit. There are a number of other lights in this format with different battery configurations offered by Nebo Tools including more compact models that take two batteries.

Where to Buy: I’ve seen similar lights at some brick and mortar hardware stores. I purchased mine at Amazon because that was the easiest place I could find the Nebo Tools brand that was recommended to me. I purchased a 3 pack for just over $7 a piece ($21.01 total) including batteries!

Nebo Tools Larry C 3 Pack on Amazon (this is an affiliate link)

These lights are available in a variety of colors, battery configurations, and bulk packs (this is an affiliate link).

Alternatives: Similar lights are available from a number of brands – just make sure you don’t overpay and that they will work hands-free all the ways you need them to. You could also use the EDC light you are already carrying.


Do you have a compact work light or other tool that want to recommend? Tell us about it below.

The EDC Tool Roll: Engineer DR-07 Twin Wrench Driver

The EDC Tool Roll is a feature on Jerking the Trigger in which we profile various every day carry worthy tools. The tools shown aren’t multi-tools but rather real tools, that by virtue of their compact size, light weight, usefulness, or unique functionality, can find a place in any range kit, emergency kit, or every day carry bag.

Feel free to comment on the tools that you carry so we can all learn! The discussion on these posts has been very valuable so far.


The Engineer DR-07 Twin Wrench Driver is my favorite screw driver solution for a compact tool kit. I’ve had it for some time now and purposely held off on mentioning it here until I could test the Tekton 14-in-1 Offset Driver as a potential lower cost alternative. While the Tekton is functional, everything about the Engineer DR-07 is a step above.

The Engineer DR-07 Twin Wrench Driver is a Japanese manufactured replaceable bit screw driver that accepts bits at either end of its “L” shaped handle. The 10 included bits and bit carrier are of excellent quality and well marked both on the bit carrier and the bits themselves. The included bits are very much like standard 1/4″ shank bits but slightly longer. However, the DR-07 will accept standard bits though they sit slightly deeper in the bit holders.

The bits are retained via a detent and spring steel collar. This set up applies solid tension even on bits that aren’t notched. The spring steel collar is thicker and provides better tension than the one found on the Tekton version. The bit holders are also magnetized which is a nice touch.

The Tekton version of this tool has a hard plastic cover on the handle but the Engineer DR-07 features a very resilient rubber handle that feels great in the hand. The rubber is molded over an entirely steel structure beneath for strength. The DR-07 also has finer knurling on the bit holders that allows good grip and fine control when turning a screw.

The beauty of this driver is the offset design. This “L” shape keeps the tool very compact but allows the user good reach and the ability to apply a lot of torque when necessary. This one is what you will find in my EDC Tool Roll more often than not. It is one of the few compact drivers that can actually reach screws like an AR-15 grip screw and still provide enough tool to hold onto when loosening or tightening the screw.

I should note that, like the previously profiled Tekton driver, this tool does NOT ratchet. For some reason, almost everyone who puts hands on this thing thinks it is going to ratchet but it does not.

Everything about this tool screams quality. The chromed finish is smooth and seemingly very durable. The bit holders have great tension and use robust parts to retain the bits. The grip is very comfortable in the hand. The included bits and bit holder are some of the nicest I’ve seen included with a tool like this. I own a handful of tools from Engineer and this is what I have come to expect from them.

Where to Buy: I’ve never seen this tool anywhere but online. I purchased mine from Amazon for around $26 shipped. It shipped from Japan which took about 3 weeks to arrive but it was worth the wait given that it is easily my favorite compact screw driver. As of the time of this writing, the price has dropped significantly to around $17 shipped on Amazon: Engineer DR-07 Twin Wrench Driver

You may also be able to find a deal on auction sites. Be advised, these will ship from Japan most of the time so expect to wait.

Alternatives: We’ve reviewed a number of other compact screw drivers in previous installments of The EDC Tool Roll (click the links below to read the reviews):

Tekton 14-in-1 Offset Screwdriver (2945) (This is nearly identical to the DR-07 but with lower, though still acceptable, quality)

Replaceable Edition Fix It Sticks

Doc Allen’s VersaTool

Wera Kraftform Kompact 25


Do you have a compact driver that you prefer or any other tool you want to recommend? Tell us about it below.

The EDC Tool Roll: Tekton 14-in-1 Offset Screwdriver

The EDC Tool Roll is a feature on Jerking the Trigger in which we profile various every day carry worthy tools. The tools shown aren’t multi-tools but rather real tools, that by virtue of their compact size, light weight, usefulness, or unique functionality, can find a place in any range kit, emergency kit, or every day carry bag.

Feel free to comment on the tools that you carry so we can all learn! The discussion on these posts has been very valuable so far.


I initially bought the Tekton 14-in-1 Offset Screwdriver (2945) because it looked like a more affordable version of one my favorite tools. It turned out to be a pretty solid tool on its own. I’ll profile the original tool in a future edition of The EDC Tool Roll.

The 14-in-1 Offset Screwdriver is a replaceable bit screwdriver that can accept bits at either end of it’s “L” shaped handle. The bits that come with it are double sided but it will also accept standard 1/4″ shank bits (they just sit a smidge deeper in the bit holder). The tool includes 7 double sided bits – hence the 14-in-1 moniker.

The bits are retained via a detent and spring steel collar. This set up applies solid tension even on bits that aren’t notched. The handle is plastic over metal with the metal seeming to run all the way through the tool. There is no flex or twisting under load so it seems that the metal shaft runs from end to end.

The beauty of this driver is the offset design. This “L” shape keeps the tool very compact but allows the user decent reach and the ability to apply a lot of torque when necessary. I find myself reaching for this tool in all kinds of situations, even when I have a tool chest full of other screw driving options. I keep this one in my range bag because it is one of the few compact drivers that can actually reach screws like an AR-15 grip screw and still provide enough tool to hold onto when loosening or tightening the screw. It’s ability to accept standard bits means I can use it on just about any fastener found on my guns.

I should note that this tool does NOT ratchet. For some reason, almost everyone who puts hands on this thing thinks it is going to ratchet but it does not. There are even people who give it poor reviews online because it doesn’t ratchet… even though the descriptions of the tool never say that it does.

I should also note that the bit holder is marginal. It holds bits but it doesn’t clip onto the tool very well which renders the pocket clip on the holder mostly useless. This wasn’t a big deal for me since I’ll never clip something like this into a pocket.

Overall, this is a very handy tool for around $10.

Where to Buy: I’ve never seen this tool or the other version of it that I use anywhere but online. I purchased mine from Amazon for $10 shipped (which is almost half what I paid for the other tool I mentioned): Tekton 14-in-1 Offset Screwdriver (2945)

Alternatives: We’ve reviewed a number of other compact screw drivers in previous installments of The EDC Tool Roll (click the links below to read the reviews):

Replaceable Edition Fix It Sticks

Doc Allen’s VersaTool

Wera Kraftform Kompact 25


Do you have a compact driver that you prefer or any other tool you want to recommend? Tell us about it below.

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