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Benchmade Snody Shakedown – 14205, 14210, 420

14205, 14210, 420… A Benchmade/Snody Shakedown!

I just reviewed the 14205. I was taken with it how it mixed tank like toughness with refined EDC-ability. So I thought that I check out some of the other Snody designed Benchmade offerings.


The 420 and 14205 have similar blades while the 14210 sports a subtle recurve (420 on top, 14205 middle, 14210 bottom)

As you can see, the 420 and 14205 are very similar in the size of the blade. Both measure about 3.4″ and both are made from .150″ thick 154CM. The 14210 is smaller with a 2.95″ blade. You can also see the differences in handle size. The 420 has a longer, thicker handle than the 14205.


Note the beautiful texture on the 14210 (420 on top, 14205 middle, 14210 bottom)

Here you have a better look at the handles and handle scales. Again, the 420 is the largest, while the 14210 is VERY compact. The 14210 would be a great compact choice for locals that require a sub 3″ bade. Also, notice the striking appearance of the 420. The black G-10 overlays on the gray anodized aluminum scales makes for a very unique appearance and give great grip.


Very classy open construction with sculpted stand-offs (420 on top, 14205 middle, 14210 bottom)

All three knives feature open construction using stand-offs instead of a one piece back spacer. This gives a very classy look. In this picture you can really see the thickness of the 420.


The 420’s pocket clip

Finally, check out the great pocket clip on the 420! It absolutely disappears in the pocket because it rides so low. The clip actually fits in a milled groove behind the G-10 scale and screws to the aluminum. It can be attached to either side for left or right hand carry. This is a very elegant solution. What a great design!

I am really coming to appreciate the Benchmade Snody designs. They give you a whole lot of knife for the money. They are nice to look at and easy to use. What more could you ask?

Benchmade 14205

The HK 14205 – A Serious Sleeper
I have been able to spend some quality time with a knife that isn’t really new to the market but you don’t seem to hear a lot about it. It seems to be overshadowed by several other “hard use” knives and never comes up in EDC conversations, yet it will fill both of those roles easily. So why should you pay attention to the Benchmade HK 14205? Let’s take a look.

Stats and Features
The 14205 is designed by Mike Snody, the money man himself. His finger prints will be obvious to anyone who is familiar with his work. It is manufactured by Benchmade and features their excellent Axis locking mechanism.

The blade is made from .150″ thick 154CM steel and is 3.40″ long. The blade features a spear point shape with an unsharpened swedge which renders a very sharp and usable point. The handle slabs are thin, textured G-10 over full steel liners. There is a large, aggressive thumb ramp. It is 4.5″ long when folded and 8.19″ long opened.

As you can see, this knife was made to be used, and used hard. However, it is also very slim and refined. So is this a hard user, an edc, or both? Maybe we can find out by comparing it to a more well known Benchmade folder.


14205 top, 520 bottom

A Comparison
The Benchmade 520 is a knife that does get talked about, at least more so than the 14205. Before I saw the 14205 in person, I figured it would just be another 520-like knife. While there are some similarities, these are two very different knives.


Note the blade thickness and large stop pins – these are beefy folders!

Both knives have 3.40″ blades made from 154CM. However, the 14205’s blade is thicker .150″ versus .130″ on the 520. Both have the large, beefy stop pins and rock solid lock up. Both offer a good grip and enough handle for your whole hand. This knife, like the 520, is obviously built for abuse.


Open construction and classy stand-offs of the 14205 versus the closed back spacer of the 520

However, the similarities end there. The 14205 features beautiful, sculpted stand-offs. This open construction is attractive, makes it easy to clean, and keeps the weight down. It is slimmer than the 520 without really sacrificing grip. It weighs only 4.92 ounces versus the 5.68 ounces that the 520 weighs. So not only is this a hard user, but it is also a refined EDC worthy knife.

Nitpicking
I am going to pick a few nits. I think the 14205 falls just touch shot of what it could have been were it not for two small items. If the full steel liners were skeletonized (like they are on the 520), it could have been even lighter without sacrificing strength. Also, it would be great if the pocket clip was attached as high as the one on the 520. This would allow the 14205 to sit lower and more discreetly in the pocket. In the scheme of everything that this knife has to offer, these are very small issues.

Conclusion
I really like this knife. It is capable of everything the beloved 520 is capable of, but it is far more pocketable. It almost seems to be having an identity crisis. Maybe that it why it doesn’t really get mentioned often – it just fits too many categories. This knife is definitely worth talking about mroe often, especially for the price. These can be picked up from very reputable sources for just over $100. This is one serious sleeper!

NWA Knives – Customer Service is NOT Dead

Background
Some time ago I completed a trade on BladeForums for a NWA W&SS Forum Knife which is now known as the Sierra Scout. I was quite excited to try my first knife from NWA based on reviews from folks on the W&SS.

I received the knife and quickly found that it was not what the person trading it had described. I immediately noticed that it has several chips in the edge that would seem to indicate this knife had been rode hard. No problem, it can be fixed. I contacted the other party in the trade and found out that he had already used the brand new knife that I traded him. To his credit he offered to pay my shipping to send it to custom knife maker Ray Laconico to have the edge repaired.

The knife arrived and Ray immediately noticed that the knife had a bend in it. It wasn’t terribly bent but it was noticeably bent. It seems this knife had lived a harder life than I thought.

I was frustrated. I loved the look and feel of the knife but now I was somewhat stuck with a knife that I could never hope to get any of my investment back from if I ever did decide to sell it. I wanted to love the knife but the experience had soured my feelings toward it.

I finally decided to contact Nick Allen (the owner/operator of NWA Knives) to see if the knife could be straightened. Nick took the time to answer all my questions and pointed out that this is one of the reasons that he differentially heat treats his knives – so they bend instead of break. He said that he thought he could straighten it and that there would be no charge. What he said next blew my mind. He offered to make me a new one. I resisted at first since it didn’t seem right for him to have to take the hit for another person’s mistake. But Nick emphasized that his main goal was to make sure I was happy with the knife.

That is called customer service. We are blessed with many great makers on BladeForums and Nick is certainly one of the best. I got the replacement knife from Nick yesterday and I haven’t had time to use it much, but I couldn’t wait to get the word out about Nick and NWA knives.

The Good Stuff

The knife that I sent back to Nick had his normal handle on it. It was well shaped with a slight finger groove for the first finger. This is the handle that you will see on most of his knives. Recently he has begun offering a more contoured handle without the finger groove which I believe he calls the bushcraft style handle. This is the handle style that I requested for the replacement. The result is excellent. The handle is comfortable in all grips and fills the hand well.

The fit and finish are excellent. The edge was nicely finished and very sharp. The scales are expertly fit to the tang with no gaps or ridges that I can feel. Nick even took the time to chamfer the lanyard hole. The temper line is visible and very beautiful. All grinds are crisp and even. Speaking of grinds, the cutting geometry is very nice for a knife that is 3/16″ thick. Nick’s use of full height flat grinds really renders an edge that cuts well. It is an impressive knife.

The sheath is one of the finest I have seen. Nick builds sheaths that are made to last. It made from very thick leather. The sheath features a fire steel loop and boasts full welt construction. It is dipped in melted bee’s wax and allowed to dry rendering it very weather proof and extremely stiff (a good thing in this case). The knife actually locks into the sheath with a click similar to kydex. Many makers provide sheaths as an afterthought, but Nick makes them just as tough as his knives.

I tend to be drawn to knife makers who have a unique style. Whether it is the intentionally rustic beauty of ML Knives or North Branch Knives, or the clean simplistic lines and modern design of Ray Laconico – make mine a knife with style. Nick has style and he has it in spades. The lines on this model (and all his knives) really flow. They have a really organic look and feel. They look like they grow on trees or drip from cave roofs over thousands of years. Even his makers mark fits the style of his knives. You know when you are looking at an NWA knife, even from across the room.

So if you are looking for a capable knife from a maker who stands behind his work, check out NWA Knives at their website www.NWAKnives.com or visit the NWA Knives forum where you can talk directly to Nick and actual users of his knives.

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