web analytics

Archive | Guns

New Ruger 10/22 Tactical

Ruger 10/22s have always been excellent suppressor hosts. Until recently, if you wanted to use a 10/22 as a suppressor host you had to purchase an aftermarket threaded barrel. This adds cost to an already expensive project.

Now, with the introduction of the new 10/22 Tactical, shooters have access to an off the shelf suppressor ready rifle. The 10/22 has all the great features that you have come to expect from the standard 10/22 with the addition of a threaded muzzle. The rifle will come equipped with a Mini-14 style flash suppressor to protect the threads (there is almost no real use for a flash suppressor on a .22LR chambered rifle).

I commend Ruger for supporting suppressor users like this.

 

wordpress hit counter

ST Action Pro Dummy Rounds

If you want to add realism to your home dry fire sessions then you need dummy rounds and the best dummy rounds that I have used are made by ST Action Pro. Dummy rounds are a must if you want to safely and realistically practice realistic reloads and malfunction clearance at home.

ST Action Pro Dummy Rounds consist of 2 parts: a real brass case (and in some cases a nickle plated brass case) and a brightly colored plastic insert. The real case makes them extremely durable. I have chambered some of my dummy rounds hundreds of times with little damage. The brightly colored case makes it nearly impossible to mistake these for real ammo.

It should be noted that these are dummy rounds, not snap caps. There is an empty cavity where the rubber bumper would normally be on a snap cap. However, these can be made into a snap caps relatively easily (sounds like a future Tactical Handyman post).

Take your dry fire training up a notch with ST Action Pro Dummy Rounds.

wordpress hit<br /> counter

Handgun Sight Review: AmeriGlo Hackathorn Sights

The Hackathorn Sights are, like the recently reviewed I-Dot sights, a relatively new offering from AmeriGlo. Their name comes from their designer, Ken Hackathorn. Mr. Hackathorn is one of the premier trainers in the tactical world and needs no introduction.

The bright red front sight demands your attention. This picture approximates the shooter's point of view (on a Glock 21SF for reference). Click to enlarge.

Stats

Front sight width: .140″

Rear sight notch: .180″

Price: $80

Front Sight

The front sight is what makes the Hackathorn sights unique. Dimensionally, it is similar to most other standard front night sights on the market. It features one tritium vial insert. The magic of the Hackathorn sights come from the wide circle of bright red/orange paint that rings the front sight. This makes the front sight incredibly fast to acquire in daylight. In low light, it behaves just as well as any other tritium front sight.

The bright red ring on the front sight is what makes these excellent sights unique. Click to enlarge.

Rear Sight

There are two ways that manufacturers typically deal with glare on the rear sight. One is to under cut the rear face of the sight and the other is serrate the rear face of the sight. AmeriGlo and Ken Hackathorn chose to serrate the rear sight in this set. It is effective, but I have found that, over time, I prefer under cut rear sights. Serrated sights have more high points and hard corners to wear and become shiny with use. They can actually become more distracting than a plain rear sight. However, this is hardly an issue since it can easily be fixed with periodic application of “sight black” (which high volume shooters are probably doing already).

The serrated rear sight does not have any tritium, outlining, or dots to distract from your front sight focus. Click to enlarge.

This rear sight also features a wide notch and sloped, snag-free profile. The wide notch allows for quick acquisition of the front sight. The sloped profile makes some one-hand manipulation techniques difficult but provides a sleek package for carry or competition.

The Hackathorn sights feature a smooth, snag-free profile. Click to enlarge.

The mix of eye catching front sight with low glare rear sight makes for an excellent combination. These sights are very, very fast. The wide rear notch and relatively wide front sight aren’t the most “bulls eye” friendly combination but they are capable of great accuracy if the shooter does their part. It is hard to argue with the experience and opinions of Ken Hackathorn. These sights are definitely worth your consideration.

wordpress hit counter

Crimson Trace Targets the Military Market

Crimson Trace is at the forefront of firearm laser design, development, and use. They have nearly single-handedly dragged the visible laser aiming device from goofy toy to viable low light force multiplier.  Now they have announced the formation of a new division called CTC Defense. The new division will cater solely to the military market but the civilian gun owner will benefit from the new technology that CTC Defense develops.

Here is the official press release from Crimson Trace:

September 1, 2010

CRIMSON TRACE ESTABLISHES NEW MILITARY DIVISION, CTC DEFENSE™

Wilsonville, OR — Crimson Trace Corporation, manufacturer of Lasergrips® and Laserguard® laser-sighting systems, has launched a new division targeting military supply channels with military grade product: CTC Defense.

Different from the commercial Crimson Trace brand, all new products have been built from the ground up using new technologies and resources that are innovative solutions for today’s hostile environments requiring white light, IR (infrared) and quick change day-to-night sighting systems.

“Adapt, Enhance and Overcome — those are the key needs for today’s modern day Warfighter”, said Dale Suzuki, Director of CTC Defense. “With the introduction of the heavily featured/modulated MVF-600, the Dual Can sighting system and platform specific solutions (HK, Sig Sauer, etc), we’ve fulfilled our vision for meeting the requirements now faced on the battlefield due to changing environments, close quarter encounters and new technologies”.

“CTC Defense is a natural progression to our growing business model and we are very proud and excited to launch this new brand and division” said Lane Tobiassen, President of Crimson Trace. “With our significant resources, superior innovation and patented technologies, we are able to provide the Military with unique products that expand and enhance their ability to be the supreme force on the battlefield.”

For more information, please contact us at 1-800-442-2406

Tactical-Life broke the story and they have the scoop on some fascinating new products that CTC Defense is developing.

 

wordpress hit counter

DDM4 V5

Daniel Defense has released the DDM4 V5. This is the 5th version of this excellent carbine that has been brought to market so far. The main difference between this and previous versions of the DDM4 is the extended free float rail. It completely covers and extends past the mid-length gas system. It is available with a cold hammer forged barrel in either standard or lightweight profile.

The DDM4 V5 comes with a host of features that make it an excellent value. The owner need only to add an optic, white light, and sling to have a well equipped carbine that is ready for anything.

wordpress hit<br /> counter

Handgun Sight Review: AmeriGlo I-Dot

The I-Dot sights are one of the newest offerings from AmeriGlo. Their name comes from their 2 dot design. Instead of lining up 3 dots horizontally like you would with most night sights, you align 2 dots vertically with the I-Dot sights. It’s like dotting an “i”. This design feels fast and intuitive in low light.

Front sight focus is easy with the I-Dot sights. This picture approximates the shooter's point of view (on a Glock 17 RTF2 for reference). Click to enlarge.

Stats

  • Front sight width: .125″
  • Rear sight notch: .180″
  • Price: $74

Front Sight

The I-Dot front sight is a pretty standard front sight. It has a tritium vile insert and a white outline.

The front sight is typical of most night sights. Click to enlarge.

Rear Sight

The I-Dot features an excellent rear sight. The notch is relatively wide (like most AmeriGlo rear sights) at .180″. This makes the front sight faster to pick up but may cost you some precision at longer distances. I find the speed gained is greater than the precision lost. It’s a worth while trade.

The bottom corners of the notch are rounded similar to a u-notch (unlike a true u-notch, the bottom is flat). These rounded corners serve to remove all of the hard edges from the sight picture except the important ones.

The rear sight features a single tritium vile insert that does not have a white outline which makes it appear smaller than the insert in the front sight. Everything about this rear sight is designed to help you focus on the front sight.

The I-Dot rear sight feature a single tritium vile that is not outlined and a wide notch with rounded corners. Click to enlarge.

The rear sight has many of it’s edges melted so it is snag free. However, the leading edge of the rear sight is left squared so that the sight can be used to cycle the slide in an emergency by catching it on a belt, holster, table top, or any other suitable surface. This may be an important feature if you train one handed manipulations.

The I-Dot rear sight has mostly "melted" corners except the leading edge which is intentionally left squared. Click to enlarge.

There is no shortage of options when it comes to excellent handgun sights. The AmeriGlo I-Dots have a slew of features and a price that makes them one of the top choices in a crowded field.

Dawson Precision Glock Sights

You usually think of competition sights when you think of Dawson Precision. That may change with the recent announcement of their tritium front sights and Charger rear sights for various handguns. My main interest is with the Glock sights, so they will be the focus of this post.

Tritium Front Sights

The Dawson Precision tritium front sights for Glocks have a lot what you have come to expect from other premium sights. The DP front sights are all .125″ wide and come in a variety of heights. This allows them to work with many of the best rear sights on the market, like Warren Tactical, 10-8, and Heinie.

Click to Enlarge

The most interesting feature is the wide skirt at the base of the sight. Glock sights typically consist of a the sight blade with a short post that drops into a hole in the slide, and a small hex head screw that locks the sight in place. This design could, at least theoretically, be sheared off with a solid hit to the front sight. The wide skirt on the Dawson Precision front sight could help prevent this from happening and since it really doesn’t cost much, if any, more than other similar front sights, you can consider it cheap insurance.

Charger Rear Sights

Many one handed manipulations of a semi-auto handgun revolve around being able to catch the rear sights on a table, belt, holster, or any other suitable surface in order to cycle the slide. The Charger Rear Sights from Dawson Precision are designed to make this task easier. They feature a large, serrated front edge that helps prevent the sight from slipping off the surface being to used to charge the handgun. This useful technique is often difficult or impossible to do with low profile or sloped sights.

The Charger Rear Sight is available in plain black, fiber optic, and tritium versions. It is nice to see Dawson Precision applying some forward thinking to something as simple as a rear sight.

wordpress hit counter

Add to: Facebook | Digg | Del.icio.us | Stumbleupon | Reddit | Blinklist | Twitter | Technorati | Yahoo Buzz | Newsvine

Tips for Low Light Training – Keep Your Light Clean

Low light training is absolutely invaluable. You won’t be able to use that light on your rifle or handgun very effectively if you haven’t had effective training.

It is not uncommon during low light training for your weapon light to become coated with a dark gray layer of unburnt powder due to the light’s proximity to the muzzle of the gun. This gradually reduces the effectiveness of your light as it becomes more and more obscured by the sooty build up.

The best way to deal with this build up is to prevent it. Put a drop of whatever gun oil that you have on the lens of the light and smear it around with your thumb until it covers the lens. When the lens starts to darken with unburnt powder, wipe it clean and reapply the oil. The oil will prevent the powder from sticking and will make it easy to wipe clean.

If you have build up that will have to be cleaned from your lens there are two methods that have been suggested to me that work very well. You can use a pencil eraser or some tooth paste on a cotton swab. Both can be used to rub the build up from the lens. I have found that the use of oil on the lens before shooting often precludes the need for any serious clean up after shooting.

Get some low light training and keep your light clean!

wordpress hit<br /> counter

Add to: Facebook | Digg | Del.icio.us | Stumbleupon | Reddit | Blinklist | Twitter | Technorati | Yahoo Buzz | Newsvine

Ruger Announces New 6.8SPC Chambering for the SR-556

Ruger announced that the SR-556 will now be available chambered in the excellent 6.8SPC. While I don’t necessarily like everything about the SR-556, I am pleased that a company like Ruger is getting behind the 6.8. Hopefully the cartridge will continue to gain traction.

This should be a pretty exciting development proponents of the 6.8SPC.

wordpress hit counter

Add to: Facebook | Digg | Del.icio.us | Stumbleupon | Reddit | Blinklist | Twitter | Technorati | Yahoo Buzz | Newsvine

Battle Arms Development – Ambidextrous Safety Selector "HYBRID" Lever

I recently reviewed the BAD-ASS on Jerking the Trigger and I am very impressed with this selector. In fact, I was so impressed that I purchased the new “HYBRID” lever option. The “HYBRID” is one of 5 lever options that are available to users of the BAD-ASS.

The "HYBRID" lever is the perfect weak side lever.

The “HYBRID” lever does everything I hoped it that it would. It is the perfect combination of easy to manipulate and low-profile. The biggest issue with ambi selectors is that the lever can interfere with the trigger finger. This is more than a minor annoyance, it can actually prevent the selector from moving completely off of “Safe”. The “HYBRID” lever is designed to be slim at the end so it can slide under the shooter’s trigger finger while still being large enough on the leading edge to be easy to manipulate.

It works.

Check out the BAD-ASS on Battle Arms Development’s website.

wordpress hit counter

Add to: Facebook | Digg | Del.icio.us | Stumbleupon | Reddit | Blinklist | Twitter | Technorati | Yahoo Buzz | Newsvine

Powered by WordPress. Designed by Woo Themes

%d bloggers like this: