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Archive | Flashlights

Batuca Battery Cases

I have been using these Batuca battery cases for about 2 years now and they are the best that I have used. They can be used to hold and organize AA and CR123 sized batteries. It splits into two sections and each section is a contrasting color. There are several different colors available. The lid snaps shut securely and opens easily by lifting a small locking tab. They are even made in the USA.

The split sections allow you to tailor the amount of batteries that you need to carry. They can also help you organize your batteries. If you use rechargeable batteries you can keep fresh on one side and spent ones on the other side. There is a ton of organization potential.

These make a great addition to your hiking/camping gear or your EDC gear.

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Surefire KX-4

The Surefire G2L is getting an upgrade. The Surefire G2L has become popular for weapon mounting thanks to it’s quality at a reasonable price and light weight. It is also a popular carry light among those who see the value in carrying a light daily.

Now, with the release of the KX4 conversion head, Surefire is increasing the output to an impressive 120 lumens while still delivering decent battery life. There is also a crenellated version called the KX4D.

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Magpul MOE Illumination Kit

The MOE Illumination Kit is available at dealers now! These will make mounting a light on the MOE handguards even more user friendly. The item that most interests me is the cantilever rail. This rail will allow the user to mount the light slightly more forward on the handguards. This can make a big difference, especially for those who run their hands out further on the handguard (closer to the muzzle).

Hopefully, Magpul will offer this cantilever rail separately someday and get the midlength MOE handguards out to dealers soon.

The Regular Guy Sessions: Jon at Danger Close Consulting

In this installment of The Regular Guy Sessions, we will be talking with Jon at Danger Close Consulting (DCC). Jon is the man responsible for the recently reviewed Low Pro Scout Mount as well as other excellent light mounts (and some pretty hilarious t-shirts). I first found Danger Close Consulting on Lightfighter where he shares his knowledge as a Moderator. I ordered one of his mounts recently and, like I said in the review, it solved a problem for me. That is what I like my gear to do – solve problems.

I have said it before and I will say it again – if you can trust the person who makes the gear, you can trust the gear. That is the point of these interviews. I want people to get to know those who are making their gear. I want to connect buyers with sellers and give people options when it comes time to spend hard earned cash on gear. I think after you learn a bit about Jon, you will certainly trust his gear.

I want to first start out by thanking Jon for his service to this country and for taking time to answer my questions. Thank you, Jon.

Can you tell us about your background?

Jon: I am an active-duty Army soldier.  I have served in Infantry and Special Forces assignments.  I am fortunate enough to have had a wide exposure to the weapons systems used by US Forces and the military forces of other nations.  I have 4 combat rotations overseas and have participated in numerous programs for the development of SOF weapons systems.  I am also an avid participant in the sport shooting arena when time permits.  I have always had an interest in firearms and tactical products, so when I got to a place where I was able to dedicate the time to developing and producing weapons peripherals it was a no-brainer.

How does your line of work influence your product design? How do end users influence your product design?

Jon: I have been afforded the opportunity to receive some of the best tactical and shooting training in the world in my job, as well as a good amount of combat experience.  I also have a network of  peers which is extremely valuable for gaining a huge amount of feedback and guidance.  These are key factors in being able to know by looking at a product or concept and know it’s strengths and weaknesses over a broad spectrum of possible uses.  I can translate this combined information into product gaps, and then I find ways to fill so end-users have what they need to most efficiently do their jobs.

What made you decide to strike out on your own when there are already a TON of light mounts on the market?

Jon: Nobody made an affordable, durable, ultra low-profile mounting system.  I could pick any two of those three traits but not all of them. By pure luck I found an experienced local machinist who could make it happen, and already had experience with making products like I needed.  Our low-profile G2 and 1″ mounts are simply a further refinement of a piece he has been making since 2003.

What makes your mounts different and better?

Jon: Our mounts provide a level of function and value few have been able to match.  I do not want to set a price that would make a Law Enforcement Officer, Service Member, or civilian shooting enthusiast have to save for two months to buy one.  My partner and I both have day jobs to pay the bills, and we produce these mounts because we love making these products.  We are also able to bring a level of expertise in both tactical experience and manufacturing capability that is not often found elsewhere.

As far as I know the Low Pro Scout Mount is the first mount of it’s kind. Where did the inspiration for the Low Profile Scout Mount come from?

Jon: Pat Rogers of EAG Tactical, 100%.  He called me and said, “Why don’t you make an offset Scout Light mount?”  And I did… (We here at Jerking the Trigger think that is probably the only proper response when Pat Rogers wants something!)

Can we look forward to more gear from DCC soon? Can you share any teasers with us?

Jon: We have a solid lineup of new gear coming out, and in addition to weapons parts we are going to introduce some specialized soft goods.  In the near future we look forward to offering a new handstop that offers improved grip, footprint, and value over others on the market as well as some new solutions for attaching slings to popular weapons systems.  I want to expand at a rate that is manageable with my primary job, and also I want to make sure we are not re-inventing the wheel with our products.  I don’t wish to compete with other manufacturers, really.  I want our products to be specialized and truly offer something different from others on the market.  If I can go buy it from LaRue, I will just go do that instead (shameless plug for LaRue, BTW.)

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Review: Danger Close Consulting Low Pro Scout Mount

Here is the bottom line up front…The Danger Close Consulting (DCC) Low Pro Scout Mount is the mount that should come with the Surefire M600 Scout Light from the start! I have had this for a couple of weeks now and it is everything that I hoped it would be and does everything I hoped it would do.

The DCC Low Profile Scout Mount works great on the Daniel Defense 9.5FSP Lite Rail.

Problem Solver

I think the one of the best compliments you can pay to a piece of gear is to say that it solves a problem. This mount solves multiple problems. The M600 Scout Light is a great weapon light in its stock form but it has some shortcomings, especially for those who will be using it without the remote pressure pad switch (I despise them). The stock mount places the light too low in relation to the shooter’s support hand grip. The light falls in a place that is awkward to reach with the support hand thumb. The stock mount also places the light high above the rail and has a large thumb screw that can be a snag magnet.

The DCC Low Pro Mount allows the user to place the light at around 11 o’clock on the rail and it tucks the light in very close to the rail. This is a much more natural position to hit with the thumb of the support hand and there is no more thumb screw to snag anything and everything.

Here you can see just how low profile the mount really is.

Attention to Detail

Attention to detail is often what separates good gear from great gear and the DCC Low Pro Scout Mount is great gear. The mount is very nicely machined with no visible machining marks. The hard anodized finish is smooth and evenly applied. There is a large hole that has been machined away to save weight. It would have been easier and cheaper to just machine a round hole, but DCC chose to mill a more complex shape that would save more weight. The set screw that provides tension against the rail even has a small rubber pad to prevent the steel screw from gouging your aluminum rails. That is attention to detail.

Note the lightening cut.

Locked Down

This mount is solid. The light is held to the mount with 2 screws (provided). I used a bit of Loc-Tite on both screws. The mount itself must be slid onto the rail from the end. The set screw should then be positioned in a rail slot. Once the set screw is in position, you simply tighten the set screw. This keeps the mount from moving forward and back by dropping into a slot and by pulling the mount up against the under side of the rail. It is rock solid.

Here you can see the two mounting screws and the green rubber pad on the set screw.

In Use

The difference when you are actually using the light must be felt to be believed. Those who are familiar with trying to use an M600 Scout Light with the factory mount will know immediately what an improvement this mount has the potential to be. I shoot with a vertical grip but I don’t wrap my hand around it. I use a thumb forward grip on it much like I would with my support hand when shooting a handgun. The original Surefire mount didn’t work very well with this grip. It was simply too low since it could only be mounted at 9 o’clock on the rail. I would have to contort my hand and shift my grip to get my thumb down to the tail cap which basically meant that I left the light unused. Now, with the DCC, the tail cap falls much more naturally under my support hand thumb at around 11 o’clock on the rail. I no longer have to shift or contort my grip and the light is much more usable.

Verdict: Buy One!

Jon at DCC is a genuinely nice guy and he is active in the Army Special Forces so he knows a bit about what makes gear work. If that isn’t enough reason to buy one, then knowing that this is the only mount of its kind should be. If you running the M600 Scout Weapon Light with the “clickie” tail cap then you need this mount. Buy one.

Look for an upcoming interview with Jon at Danger Close Consulting on Jerking the Trigger.

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RiverofGuns.com

Some of the best places to get discounted guns, knives, and tactical gear are on the various discussion forums that are scattered around the web. Many people use these places to list their new and used gear in the hopes that you will buy it. Think of them as a classifieds section in your local paper except they reach the entire nation (and the world). There are some serious deals to be had but it can be quite time consuming to surf all of the different forums looking for your particular item.

RiverofGuns.com is a search engine that scours hundreds of forums so that you don’t have to. You simply enter what you are looking for and click search. River of Guns does the rest.

It is an invaluable tool for bargain seekers.

Preview: Danger Close Consulting Offset Surefire Scout Mount

The Surefire M600 Scout Light is one of the most compact and lightweight rifle mounted weapon lights available. It is truly an excellent light. However, I have always had issues determining the best place to mount it since I do not care for tape switches and the standard mount places it in an uncomfortably low position for use with the support hand thumb. The Scout is a light in need of an offset mount but, until recently, no one made them.

Danger Close Consulting has filled that niche and filled it well! I have one of their mounts in hand and it is excellent.

Look for a more complete review with pictures to be posted here soon.

New Lights From Princeton Tec

Princeton Tec just added two new lights to their website. Both of the lights were shown at the 2010 SHOT Show but this is the first time I have seen detailed specs on them.

The first is the Remix Pro. The most interesting thing about this light is that it runs on a single CR123A battery. That should make it very light weight and compact. It can be had with red, green, or white 5mm LEDs and a single white Maxbright LED. I have come to appreciate a useful red light setting on a head lamp for times when I am trying not to mess up my dark adjusted vision. This light looks quite good on paper.

The second light, the MPLS, is very interesting to me. It has a mounting system that will allow it to be attached to a number of things like helmets, weapon rails, PALs webbing, etc. It has a flexible neck that allows the user to quickly aim the light to where ever it is needed. The body of the light appears to be based on the Princeton Tec Pilot which I have used as a back up light on my headlamps for years. This looks like an extremely versatile piece of gear, I just wish it took something other than coin cell batteries.

Energizer Hard Case Head Lamp Giveaway!

The contest is closed. Random.org generated 1047 as the winning number. I will be contacting the winner right away.

This is no April Fools joke. Jerking the Trigger is giving away a brand new Energizer Hard Case LED Head Lamp to our readers!

Light-reviews.com has posted an excellent review of this head lamp. The Hard Case Head Lamp has a lot going for it. It is very rugged and durable. The red and green LEDs operate on a different switch from the white light which lets you shuffle through the red and green light modes without the risk of destroying your dark adjusted vision. The white light has two brightness modes and is quite bright on high. Energizer claims that it puts out 100 lumens. This is a great head lamp!

The Important Stuff:

All you have to do to enter is comment on this thread and enter a number between 1 and 2000. To reply, click on “leave a comment” in the heading above this text. Make sure that you comment in the correct thread. Comments left in the wrong thread will not be counted. This contest is open to those with USA and APO/FPO addresses only. One entry per person please.

The contest will end at 8PM April 9th, 2010 (Friday). I will use a random number generator to choose a winner at that time. You will be asked to register by WordPress in order to leave a comment. Use a valid email address because I will be using the email address to contact the winner. Jerking the Trigger will never divulge your email address or send you any kind of advertisements.

In the event that the winning number has been chosen by more than one person, I will assign each person’s entry a number based on the order that they were received and use the number generator to determine a winner.

The contest is closed. Random.org generated 1047 as the winning number. I will be contacting the winner right away.

Tactical Handyman – Flashlight Maintenance

You already know why you should carry a quality flashlight and you have already dropped some serious coin on the best light that you could afford. So, now what? A lot of guys know how to maintain their firearms. They may even know how to maintain the knife that they carry clipped in their pocket. But how many Regular Guys know how to maintain their flashlights? That’s right, that piece of absolutely essential life saving gear that you carry so you can see in the dark needs some occasional maintenance.

The o-rings, threads, contacts, and mechanical parts all need some attention once in a while. Parts need to be cleaned and lubed to promote the best function of the light. You may want to consider doing the following procedure at least once or twice a year if you are carrying the same light everyday. If you do this maintenance regularly, you will increase the likelihood that your light will be ready when you need it.

Materials:

  • A flashlight
  • Light oil (NO WD-40!!! CLP works pretty well and you probably already have some)
  • Lithium grease (I like the dielectric bulb grease that many auto parts stores sell.)
  • Cotton swabs
  • Rag
  • Rubbing Alcohol
  • Replacement o-rings (as necessary)

Procedure:

  1. Disassemble your flashlight down to its major components. In most cases this will be tail cap, bezel (or head), and body.

    Click on any image to enlarge.

  2. Inspect the o-rings. There will likely be an at least 1 o-ring at each sections of male threads. Replace them if they are cut, torn, or broken. This will keep the light water resistant and pocket lint resistant.
  3. Wipe the threads and o-rings with a rag to remove most of the old lubrication. Then use a cotton swab dipped in rubbing alcohol to thoroughly clean the threads and o-ring. Remember, with some lights, the threads are an electrical contact. They should be kept clean for best performance.

    Clean and lube all threads, including the female threads.

  4. Apply a light coating of grease to the threads and the o-ring. O-rings should always be greased. This will make the light more water resistant and protect the o-rings from wear and tear.
  5. Clean any electrical contacts with rubbing alcohol soaked cotton swab. This will help clean any oxidization from the contact that may hinder performance. You may also want to look into a product like Deoxit if you have a lot of oxidization on the contacts.

    Electrical contacts should be shiny.

  6. Place a drop or two of oil down into the mechanism of your tail cap and work the switch a few times. This is especially important on “clicky” style tail caps since they have more moving parts. The mechanism can often benefit from some lubrication and cleaning just like any other mechanical object. I usually just use CLP because I have plenty of it and it contains cleaners as well as lubricants. The switch (tail cap) is just about the only moving part in a flashlight. If your light is going to fail, it will happen at the switch. Do not neglect this.

    Try to get a drop of oil down into the mechanism.

Don’t forget the more obvious maintenance tasks. Replace your batteries at least once every six months, even if you don’t think you need it. This is akin to doing a tactical reload on your handgun after use and before you holster it. You want you light in the best condition possible because you don’t know what will happen next. If your still using a flashlight with an incandescent bulb, you may want to consider swapping it out once a year for the same reasons. Switching to a newer LED based light is an even better idea.

Taking care of your flashlight really isn’t rocket science. The whole procedure will probably less than 10 minutes. That is time well spent.

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