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SCAR Blades

I like my knives simple. Knives are at their best when they are made from simple carbon steels, with functional handle slabs made from micarta, and a sheath that gives me as many carry options as possible. All of those things can be found standard on every knife that SCAR Blades makes.

SCAR Blades makes all of their knives from 1095 steel which is a personal favorite of mine because it is tough, easy to sharpen, and it can take a very refined edge. All of their knives have hand fit micarta handles and kydex sheaths. They also coat their knives for corrosion resistance.

SCAR Blades may be relatively new to the scene but they seem to have found a very good recipe for simple knives that work. Check out SCAR Blades on Blade HQ.

TAREINCO LoPro Pick Sheaths

If you have been reading JTT for long, you know that we love the Bogota Entry Toolsets that SerePick.com sells. We have reviewed just about every set that they make and have found them to be easy to use and easy to carry. They are now even easier to carry thanks to the TAREINCO LoPro Pick Sheaths.

TAREINCO will be making two different sizes. One will accommodate the smaller Bogota Entry Toolsets. The other is a larger size that will accommodate the larger Bogota Titan Flats or similarly sized traditional picks. The sheaths are made from 1″ wide webbing and have Velcro closures. They also have a belt loop that will work with belts up to 2″ thick or allow the sheath to be attached to PALS webbing.

The LoPro Pick Sheaths are not available on the TAREINCO website yet. You can check them out on the TAREINCO Facebook Page.

TOPS Knives LITE TREKKER

When Joe Flowers designs a knife, I take notice. Joe is an avid outdoorsman who has been the brains behind several great survival knife designs like the previously reviewed Machete .230. His latest is another collaboration with TOPS Knives – the LITE TREKKER.

The LITE TREKKER is built to be a lightweight, all-around outdoors blade. To that end, it is made from one of the all time great knife steels for that application – 1095. The 1/8″ thick 1095 and tall flat grind means this knife should be a great cutter that is easy to keep sharp in the field. The handle has a large guard and offers several color options that range from discreet to highly visible.

Any knife can be a great aid when you are building a fire but the LITE TREKKER has some features that really help it excel at fire prep. It comes with a compact magnesium/ferrocerium fire starter. The spine of the knife is ground square to make it better for scraping fire starters.

As with most TOPS Knives, the LITE TREKKER comes with a kydex sheath with a steel spring clip. Check out the LITE TREKKER on TOPSKnives.com.

Be Heard: What Do You Carry in Addition to a Handgun?

In the last installment of Be Heard I asked you what handgun you carried and why. It was a great discussion with plenty of well reasoned responses (and tons of GLOCK owners). Now, I want to hear what you carry with your handgun and why.

Do you carry a knife? A light? How about a spare magazine? What else do you carry? Let us know what you carry and why so we can all start learning from each other. This is your chance to Be Heard!

 

ESEE News

ESEE released some new photos of their upcoming stainless models. The ESEE 4 and Izula will be available in 440C stainless steel sometime in 2013. 440C is a great choice given ESEE’s commitment to keeping their knives easy to sharpen in the field. The stainless models will not be coated like the current 1095 carbon steel models.

Speaking of a lack of coating, ESEE is also currently considering releasing some uncoated versions of their 1095 steel models. If this is something that interests you, visit the ESEE forum and weigh in on the topic.

ITS Tactical Titanium Entry Card

Here is what I know. Bogota rakes are great at bypassing locks even for inexperienced users, credit cards are easy to carry, and titanium makes everything better. So, I can tell you definitively that the new Titanium Entry Card from ITS Tactical is pretty stinking cool.

The ITS Titanium Entry Card contains 2 complete sets of Entry Tool (2 triple humps, 2 single humps, and 2 tension wrenches) in an easy to carry .032″ thick credit card format. The duplicate sets mean that even after you have used a set, you will still have an additional set stored in the easy to carry credit card shape. The titanium construction means that it has no magnetic signature and resists corrosion.

You can check out the ITS Titanium Entry Card on ITSTactical.com.

Review: ECHO NiNER Mini Flat Pouch

The ECHO NiNER Mini Flat Pouch has a pretty appropriate name. It is small and basically flat, but that doesn’t really tell the whole story of what this little pouch does.

The E9 Mini Flat Pouch is sized perfectly sized to carry items like memory cards, remotes and more.

Overview

The E9 Mini Flat Pouch measures 3” x 2.5” when it is folded.  The front of the pouch is nearly completely covered with a loop Velcro panel and has a small zipper that allows access to the pouch. The Velcro allows the Mini Flat Pouch to serve as a patch/ID carrier (like a PRESS patch), while the pouch is the perfect size for spare memory cards, a small camera remote, spare cash, or similar sized items.

It has a tri-fold design that allows it to wrap around whatever you are attaching it to and secure with Velcro. The surfaces that engage whatever the Mini Flat Pouch are wrapped around are coated with the same grippy gel-like material that is used on the E9 Original Camera Strap. The material does a great job of preventing the pouch from sliding around even when it is mounted on slippery material like tubular webbing.

This rubber material helps lock the E9 Mini Flat Pouch in place on wherever you put it.

Observations from Use

This is a handy little pouch for an amateur photographer like me. It is great for keeping my camera remote and a couple of spare memory cards on hand while I am shooting a piece of gear for review. Keeping them in the Mini Flat Pouch like this means they stay attached to the camera and out of my pockets (and out of the washing machine when I forget to take them out of my pockets).

I kept the Mini Flat Pouch attached to a camera strap for most of the time that I have been reviewing it. The tri-fold, Velcro closure means I can move it easily between my cameras so it can be attached to whichever I am using at the time. I also found that it was very handy on a backpack strap which is where I kept it while I was attending a recent event.

The back of the pouch features the E9 logo.

The tri-fold design allows Mini Flat Pouch to lay very flat. It is hard to imagine that a pouch could have a lower profile than this. This low profile design makes it best suited to carrying mostly flat items. It won’t carry much in terms of volume but it carries everything I need it to carry.

It could be used to carry an extremely compact boo-boo or survival kit. The Mini Flat Pouch could easily handle a few meds, some adhesive bandages, antibiotic ointment packet, and similar items that you might find in a boo-boo kit. You could just as easily pack away a small ferro rod, water treatment tablets, button compass, and other useful survival items.

The only complaint that I have with the pouch is the zipper. It appears to be of high quality but the zipper pull jingles like a cheap bell when you move. I snipped off the metal zipper pull with wire cutters and replaced it with gutted para-cord to save my sanity.

The Mini Flat Pouch is right at home at a camera strap like this ECHO NiNER Light Speed Camera Strap.

Wrap Up

ECHO NiNER takes a simple pouch and dresses it up into something more useful with the addition of an ID/Patch carrier. The no-slip, tri-fold design makes it easy to attach to just about any strap and it really does a great job of staying out of your way even when mounted on your camera strap. I would like to see them get rid of the metal zipper pull.

Check out the ECHO NiNER Mini Flat Pouch on ENiNER.com.

Disclosure: ECHO NiNER sent me the Mini Flat Pouch for review, free of charge.

The Mini Flat Pouch can be attached to a variety of objects like this backpack strap.

Armordillo Concealment X-FER

The X-FER from Armordillo Concealment is a compact, minimalist kydex holster that accommodates a weapon mounted light. There are other holsters that are similar on the market but few, if any, work with a weapon mounted light.

The holster is called the X-FER because it can be transferred to any handgun that will fit a weapon light. The holster actually locks onto the light instead of the handgun.

Check out the X-FER at ArmordilloConcealment.com.

Swedish FireKnife from Light My Fire

What happens when you combine the excellent quality FireSteels of Light My Fire with the well known, high value knife maker, Mora of Sweden? You get the Swedish FireKnife.


The Swedish FireKnife is a Mora Knife that has a FireSteel stored in the handle. Light My Fire FireSteels are among the best I have ever used and Mora Knives are extremely well known for their value. So, this a match made in heaven. The knife weighs only 3.3 ounces, features a 12C27 steel blade, and a rubber over-molded hard plastic handle. It also comes with a hard plastic sheath and is available in a variety of colors.

Like a typical Mora Knife, the Swedish FireKnife costs less than you might think. Check out the Swedish FireKnife on LightMyFire.com.

What Makes a Knife Tactical?

“What makes a knife tactical?” is a common question among knife users everywhere. Some insist that there is no difference between a regular knife and a tactical knife – that the current use dictates how tactical it is. Others point out that there are some common threads among knives that are intended to be “tactical.” If ever there was a subject matter expert on what makes a knife “tactical” it would be Ernest Emerson who practically invented the tactical folding knife.

Mr. Emerson recently wrote an article entitled “10 Things That Make a Tactical Knife” that can be read at the DailyCaller.com. When Ernest Emerson writes, I read it.

EmersonKnives.com

Hat tip to Dann at God, Gals, Guns, Grub.

 

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